The Inherent Evils of All State Governments Demonstrated: Being a Reprint of [his] Essay, "A Vindication of Natural Society": with Notes and an Appendix (Google eBook)

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1858 - 66 pages
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Page 21 - Our Life is turned Out of her course, wherever Man is made An offering, or a sacrifice, a tool Or implement, a passive Thing employed As a brute mean, without acknowledgment Of common right or interest in the end; Used or abused, as selfishness may prompt.
Page 44 - Thus are we running in a circle, without modesty, and without end, and making one error and extravagance an excuse for the other. My sentiments about these arts and their cause, I have often discoursed with my friends at large.
Page 17 - All Writers on the Science of Policy are agreed, and they agree with Experience, that all Governments must frequently infringe the Rules of Justice to support themselves; that Truth must give way to Dissimulation; Honesty to Convenience; and Humanity itself to the reigning Interest.3 The Whole of this Mystery of Iniquity is called the Reason of State.
Page 6 - War is the matter that fills all history, and consequently the only or almost the only view in which we can see the external of political society, is in a hostile shape; and the only actions, to which we have always seen, and still see all of them intent, are such as tend to the destruction of one another.
Page 39 - ... against the oppression of the rich and powerful. But surely no pretence can be so ridiculous ; a man might as well tell me he has taken off my load, because he has changed the burden. If the poor man is not able to support his suit, according to the vexatious and expensive manner established in civilized countries, has not the rich as great an advantage over him as the strong has over the weak in a state of nature ? But we...
Page 42 - Indeed, the blindness of one part of mankind, co-operating with the phrensy and villany of the other, has been the real builder of this respectable fabric of political society: and as the blindness of mankind has caused their slavery, in return, their state of slavery is made a pretence for continuing them in a state of blindness; for the politician will tell you, gravely, that their life of servitude disqualifies the greater part of the race of man for a search of truth, and supplies them with no...
Page 7 - The first accounts we have of mankind are but so many accounts of their butcheries. All empires have beea cemented in blood and in those early periods when the race of mankind began first to form themselves into parties and combinations, the first effect of the combination, and indeed the end for which it seems purposely formed, and best calculated, is their mutual destruction.
Page 39 - Ask of politicians the end for which laws were originally designed ; and they will answer, that the laws were designed as a protection for the poor and weak, against the oppression of the rich and powerful.
Page 42 - ... life of servitude disqualifies the greater part of the race of man for a search of truth, and supplies them with no other than mean and insufficient ideas. This is but too true ; and this is one of the reasons for which I blame such institutions. In a misery of this sort, admitting some few lenitives, and those too but a few, nine parts in ten of the whole race of mankind drudge through life.
Page 42 - ... of the world affords of the same nature. Millions daily bathed in the poisonous damps and destructive effluvia of lead, silver, copper, and arsenic. To say nothing of those other employments, those stations of wretchedness and contempt, in which civil society has placed the numerous enfans perdus of her army.

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