Making a Living in Your Local Music Market: Realizing Your Marketing Potential

Front Cover
Hal Leonard Corporation, 2006 - Music - 207 pages
3 Reviews
You can survive happily as a musician in your local music market. This book shows you how to expand and develop your skills as a musician and a composer right in your own backyard. Making a Living in Your Local Music Market explores topics relevant to musicians of every level: Why should a band have an agreement? How can you determine whether a personal manager is right for you? Are contests worth entering? What trade papers are the most useful? Why copyright your songs? Also covers: * Developing and packaging your artistic skills in the marketplace * Dealing with contractors, unions, club owners, agents, etc. * Producing your own recordings * Planning your future in music * Music and the Internet * Artist-operated record companies * The advantages and disadvantages of independent and major record labels * Grant opportunities for musicians and how to access them * College music business programs * Seminars and trade shows * Detailed coverage of regional music markets, including Austin, Atlanta, Denver, Miami, Seattle, and Portland, Oregon.
  

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - chriszodrow - LibraryThing

A good primer. Gave me some good ideas about strategies and tactics for local work. Sobering questions and helpful hints. Interesting brief histories on local music scenes. A bit behind the times in ... Read full review

Contents

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About the author (2006)

Dick Weissman was a member of the legendary folk trio the Journeymen, with Scott McKenzie and John Phillips. He has written 13 books on music and the music industry and teaches at the University of Denver. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

Bibliographic information