The "Racial" Economy of Science: Toward a Democratic Future (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Sandra Harding
Indiana University Press, Oct 22, 1993 - Philosophy - 544 pages
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"The classic and recent essays gathered here will challenge scholars in the natural sciences, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and women's studies to examine the role of racism in the construction and application of the sciences. Harding... has also created a useful text for diverse classroom settings." -- Library Journal

"A rich lode of readily accessible thought on the nature and practice of science in society. Highly recommended." -- Choice

"This is an excellent collection of essays that should prove useful in a wide range of STS courses." -- Science, Technology, and Society

"... important and provocative... " -- The Women's Review of Books

"The timeliness and utility of this large interdisciplinary reader on the relation of Western science to other cultures and to world history can hardly be overemphasized. It provides a tremendous resource for teaching and for research... " -- Ethics

"Excellent." -- The Reader's Review

"Sandra Harding is an intellectually fearless scholar. She has assembled a bold, impressive collection of essays to make a volume of illuminating power. This brilliantly edited book is essential reading for all who seek understanding of the multicultural debates of our age. Never has a book been more timely." -- Darlene Clark Hine

These authors dispute science's legitimation of culturally approved definitions of race difference -- including craniology and the measurement of IQ, the notorious Tuskegee syphilis experiments, and the dependence of Third World research on First World agendas.

  

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The "Racial" economy of science: toward a democratic future

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Have Western sciences been entirely progressive, particularly in regards to "race?'' Or is their inherent Eurocentrism responsible for perpetuating a "racial economy''--that is, for parceling out ... Read full review

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Why after pg. 83 does is a completely different book displayed. It is not even stated that the chapters following pg. 83 are in fact from "The Mismeasure of Man" by Stephen Jay Gould. This makes me think twice about referencing to this cite in order to preview a book, it is frustrating that certain chapters displayed, when reading Sandra G. Harding, is not even from her book!  

Contents

Eurocentric Scientific IlliteracyA Challenge
1
EARLY NONWESTERN SCIENTIFIC TRADITIONS
7
Poverties and Triumphs of the Chinese Scientific Tradition
30
Martin Berna
47
Early Andean Experimental Agriculture
64
Blacks
84
Gloria A Marshall
116
The Study of Race
128
James Jones
275
Phillida Bunkle
287
Colonialism and the Evolution of Masculinist Forestry
303
The Struggle
315
Environmental Racism
326
Methods and Values in Science
341
The Role of Analogy in Science
359
Donna Haraway
377

Lewontin Steven Rose and Leon J Kamin
142
Disease Class and Ideology in Science
161
The Rejection
170
Race and the Cult
201
NineteenthCentury
210
The Role of Foundation Support
228
A Black Womans JourneyAn
239
Increasing the Participation of Black Women in Science
249
The Characteristics
259
Japan and the United States
398
The Relevance of Anthropology to Colonialism and Imperialism
408
TOWARD A DEMOCRATIC STRATEGY FOR WORLD SCIENCES
429
Bill Zimmerman et al
440
Science and Black People
456
Politics of Science
472
A Third World Response
484
Name Index
519
Copyright

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About the author (1993)

SANDRA HARDING, a philosopher, is Professor of Education and Women Studies at UCLA. She is author of Whose Science: Whose Knowledge?: Thinking from Women's Lives and The Science Question in Feminism, and editor of Feminism and Methodology: Social Science Issues.

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