The stones of Venice

Front Cover
Moyer Bell, 1989 - Architecture - 239 pages
0 Reviews
John Ruskin, the most influential Victorian art critic, was always fascinated by the melancholy beauty of Venice. During his fourth visit to the city in 1849 he began work on the first volume of what was to become his masterpiece: THE STONES OF VENICE.In some of the most splendid prose of the nineteenth century he describes and explains the three main styles of Venetian architecture - Byzantine, Gothic and Renaissance - providing not only an unsurpassed analysis of the flowering of Southern Gothic, but a wonderful guide to the sea-city.Ruskin illustrated most of the important buildings of Venice in delicate and evocative watercolors. Many of these are reproduced in this volume, together with his plates and many of his meticulous drawings. In this sensitively designed new edition of his great book, superb color and monochrome photographs show what he could not.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
7
The Quarry
33
The Throne
53
Copyright

8 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1989)

From his early youth John Ruskin drew obsessively, a discipline that he not only kept up right through the production of his great literary works, but which was essential to them. This book is the result of quite considerable teaching experience.

Jan Morris is a travel writer and historian. Her many books include Hong Kong: Epilogue to an Empire, The Venetian Empire: A Sea Voyage, Conundrum, and Among the Cities.

Bibliographic information