Everything Ravaged, Everything Burned: Stories

Front Cover
Macmillan, Mar 17, 2009 - Fiction - 238 pages
17 Reviews

Viking marauders descend on a much-plundered island, hoping some mayhem will shake off the winter blahs. A man is booted out of his home after his wife discovers that the print of a bare foot on the inside of his windshield doesn’t match her own. Teenage cousins, drugged by summer, meet with a reckoning in the woods. A boy runs off to the carnival after his stepfather bites him in a brawl.

In the stories of Wells Tower, families fall apart and messily try to reassemble themselves. His version of America is touched with the seamy splendor of the dropout, the misfit: failed inventors, boozy dreamers, hapless fathers, wayward sons. Combining electric prose with savage wit, Everything Ravaged, Everything Burned is a major debut, announcing a voice we have not heard before.

  

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Review: Everything Ravaged, Everything Burned

User Review  - Sarah - Goodreads

My friend Evaughn and I both enjoy bleak and dreary stories, so I was thrilled when she turned me onto Tower's debut short story collection. In “The Brown Coast,” Tower enunciates Bob Munroe's ... Read full review

Review: Everything Ravaged, Everything Burned

User Review  - Marc Kozak - Goodreads

During the course of reading this, a few different people asked me what I was reading. When I responded "Wells Tower," every single person thought that was the name of the book and not the author. I ... Read full review

Contents

RETREAT
29
EXECUTORS OF IMPORTANT ENERGIES
63
DOWN THROUGH THE VALLEY
89
LEOPARD
111
DOOR IN YOUR EYE
129
WILD AMERICA
149
ON THE SHOW
185
EVERYTHING RAVAGED EVERYTHING BURNED
217
Acknowledgments
241
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Wells Tower's short stories and journalism have appeared in The New Yorker, Harper's Magazine, McSweeney's, The Paris Review, The Anchor Book of New American Short Stories, The Washington Post Magazine, and elsewhere. He received two Pushcart Prizes and the Plimpton Prize from The Paris Review. He divides his time between Chapel Hill, North Carolina and Brooklyn, New York.

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