The Sporting review, ed. by 'Craven'. (Google eBook)

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John William Carleton
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Page 242 - The spinsters and the knitters in the sun, And the free maids that weave their thread with bones, Do use to chant it ; it is silly sooth, And dallies with the innocence of love, Like the old age.
Page 326 - Tis sweet to hear the watchdog's honest bark Bay deep-mouthed welcome as we draw near home; Tis sweet to know there is an eye will mark Our coming, and look brighter when we come...
Page 192 - Should I turn upon the true prince ? Why, thou knowest, I am as valiant as Hercules: but beware instinct; the lion will not touch the true prince. Instinct is a great matter ; I was a coward on instinct.
Page 60 - ... a custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black stinking fume thereof, nearest resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of the pit that is bottomless.
Page 281 - See how the well-taught pointer leads the way ; The scent grows warm ; he stops : he springs the prey; The fluttering coveys from the stubble rise, And on swift wing divide the sounding skies ; The scattering lead pursues the certain sight, And death in thunder overtakes their flight.
Page 245 - Her young forsake her downy plumes To rest upon thy opening blooms. Flower of the desert though thou art! The deer that range the mountain free, The graceful doe, the stately hart, Their food and shelter seek from thee; The bee thy earliest blossom greets, And draws from thee her choicest sweets.
Page 120 - But we their sons, a pamper'd race of men, Are dwindled down to threescore years and ten. Better to hunt in fields for health unbought Than fee the doctor for a nauseous draught. The wise for cure on exercise depend : God never made His work for man to mend.
Page 279 - I was hunting a young pointer, the dog ran on a brood of very small partridges: the old bird cried, fluttered, and ran tumbling along just before the dog's nose till she had drawn him to a considerable distance, when she took wing, and flew still farther off, but not out of the field: on this...
Page 191 - Won by three-quarters of a length, half a length between the second and third, a head between the third and fourth.
Page 15 - Lastly, the temper is of the utmost importance, by which must be understood not that gentleness at grass which may lead the breeder's family to pet the mare, but such a temper as will serve for the purposes of her rider, and will answer to the stimulus of the voice, whip, or spur.

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