Fauna Boreali-americana, Or, The Zoology of the Northern Parts of British America: The fish, by J. Richardson. 1836 (Google eBook)

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J. Murray, 1836 - Zoology - 220 pages
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Page 216 - STUART'S LAKE. Salmon arrived. In the month of June we took out of this lake twenty-one sturgeon, that were from eight to twelve feet in length. One of them measured twelve feet two inches from its extreme points, four feet eleven inches round the middle, and would weigh from five hundred and fifty to six hundred pounds.
Page 69 - He is called weak-fish, as some say, because he does not pull very much after he is hooked ;* or as others allege, because the laboring men who are fed upon him are weak by reason of the deficient nourishment in that kind of food. Certain peculiar noises under water, of a low rumbling or drumming kind, are ascribed by the fishermen to the squeteague. Whether the sounds come from these fishes or not, it is certain that during their season, they may be heard coming from the bottom of the water; and...
Page 214 - We now have the common salmon in abundance. They weigh from five to seven pounds. There are, also, a few of a larger kind, which will weigh sixty or seventy pounds. Both of them are very good, when just taken out of the water. But, when dried, as they are by the Indians here, by the heat of the sun, or in the smoke of a fire, they are not very palatable. When salted, they are excellent. "As soon as the salmon come into this lake, they go in search of the rivers and brooks that fall into it; and these...
Page 261 - ... after which he keeps watch over the sacred deposit, and guards it from every foe with the utmost courage. If driven from the spot by man, he does not go far, but is continually looking back, and in a short time returns.
Page 154 - Accordingly one of the salmon, escaping from the net, rushed down the stream with great velocity, towards the ford, where the dog stood to receive him at an advantage. A very diverting chase now commenced, in which, from the shallowness of the water, we could discern the whole track of the fish, with all its rapid turnings and windings. After a smart pursuit, the dog found himself left considerahly behind, in consequence of the water deepening, by which he had been reduced to the necessity of swimming.
Page 218 - ... together, and five on the top of them. The whole is then wrapped up in mats, and made fast by cords, over which mats are again thrown. Twelve of these baskets, each of which contains from ninety to a hundred pounds, form a stack...
Page 216 - Salmon again begin to make their appearance in all the rivers of any considerable magnitude ; and they have them at most of their villages in plenty until the latter end of September, or the beginning of October. For about a month they come up in crowds, and the noses of some of them are either worn or rotted off, and the eyes of others have perished in their heads ; yet in this maimed condition they are surprisingly alert in coming up rapids.
Page 149 - At the mouths of rivers they rise freely at the artificial fly within fifty yards of the sea; and the common earth-worm is a deadly bait for the clean Salmon.
Page 168 - ... account, the wonder will cease. Indeed, they were so numerous at the foot of the fall, that when a light pole, armed with a few spikes, which was the instrument the old woman used, was put under water and hauled up with a jerk, it was scarcely possible to miss them. Some of my Indians tried the...
Page 218 - When it is sufficiently dried it is pounded fine between two stones till it is pulverized, and is then placed in a basket about two feet long, and one in diameter, neatly made of grass and rushes, and lined with the skin of a salmon stretched and dried for the purpose. Here...

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