Willson's Intermediate Fifth Reader: On the Original Plan of the School and Family Series; Embracing, in Brief, the Principles of Rhetoric, Criticism, Eloquence, and Oratory, as Applied to Both Prose and Poetry. The Whole Adapted to Elocutionary Instruction (Google eBook)

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Harper & Brothers, 1870 - Readers and speakers - 372 pages
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Page 361 - And nightly to the list'ning earth Repeats the story of her birth : Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, And spread the truth from pole to pole.
Page 285 - When my eyes shall be turned to behold, for the last time, the sun in heaven, may I not see him shining on the broken and dishonored fragments of a once glorious Union; on States dissevered, discordant, belligerent; on a land rent with civil feuds, or drenched, it may be, in fraternal blood ! Let their last, feeble, and lingering glance rather behold the gorgeous ensign of the republic, now known and honored throughout the earth, still full high advanced...
Page 101 - Will the Lord cast off for ever? and will he be favourable no more ? Is his mercy clean gone for ever? doth his promise fail for evermore? Hath God forgotten to be gracious? hath he in anger shut up his tender mercies?
Page 79 - ... for expert men can execute and perhaps judge of particulars one by one, but the general counsels, and the plots and marshalling of affairs, come best from those that are learned.
Page 243 - Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace, With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards, his design Moves like a ghost. Thou sure and firm-set earth, Hear not my steps, which way they walk, for fear The very stones prate of my whereabout, And take the present horror from the time, Which now suits with it.
Page 285 - I have not allowed myself, sir, to look beyond the Union, to see what might lie hidden in the dark recess behind. I have not coolly weighed the chances of preserving liberty when the bonds that unite us together shall be broken asunder. I have not accustomed myself to hang over the precipice of disunion, to see whether, with my short sight, I can fathom the depth of the abyss below...
Page 233 - tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune Or to take arms against a sea of troubles And by opposing end them ? To die to sleep No more and by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to 'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wished.
Page 251 - O sweet and far from cliff and scar The horns of Elfland faintly blowing ! Blow, let us hear the purple glens replying : Blow, bugle ; answer, echoes, dying, dying, dying.
Page 182 - And I will make thy seed as the dust of the earth : so that if a man can number the dust of the earth, then shall thy seed also be numbered.
Page 168 - Now his elder son was in the field; and as he came and drew nigh to the house, he heard music and dancing.

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