Prison madness: the mental health crisis behind bars and what we must do about it

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Jossey-Bass, Jan 22, 1999 - Law - 301 pages
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A Disturbing and Shocking Expose-A Passionate Cry for Reform

Prison Madness exposes the brutality and failure of today's correctional system-for all prisoners-but especially the incredible conditions Andured by those suffering from serious mental disorders.

"A passionately argued and brilliantly written wake-up call to America about the myriad ways our penal systems brutalize our entire culture. Dr. Kupers not only diagnoses the problem, he also offers a set of solutions. I hope this book will be read by all concerned citizens and voters, for it conveys truths that are vitally important to all of us."-James Gilligan, Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, and author of Violence: Reflections on a National Epidemic

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Review: Prison Madness: The Mental Health Crisis Behind Bars and What We Must Do about It

User Review  - Larissa - Goodreads

I liked it but would have preferred he backed of some of the things he stated as fact with some data and references throughout the book. I(Such as the number of homeless people with mental illness- he ... Read full review

Review: Prison Madness: The Mental Health Crisis Behind Bars and What We Must Do about It

User Review  - Amy Antcliffe - Goodreads

I'm about half way and finding it a most difficult read. Absolutely harrowing. Will persist, though Read full review

Contents

The Mentally Ill Behind Bars
9
Why So Many Prisoners Develop Mental
39
The Failure of Current Mental Health Programs
65
Copyright

11 other sections not shown

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About the author (1999)

TERRY KUPERS M.D., a psychiatrist and professor at the Wright Institute in Berkeley, is cochair of the Committee on the Mentally Ill Behind Bars of the American Association of Community Psychiatrists. He has served as an expert witness in more than a dozen class action lawsuits concerning the conditions of confinement and the adequacy of mental health services in jails and prisons. Kupers has also served as a consultant to the Civil Rights Division of the U.S. Department of Justice and to Human Rights Watch.