Apocalyptic in history and tradition

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Sheffield Academic Press, 2002 - Religion - 332 pages
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Apocalyptic themes have formed a significant part of the Jewish and Christian religions. This is becoming more widely recognized, but it is the pervasiveness of such themes in art, literature and history which contributes most to this collection of essays, moving from the study of biblical apocalyptic to its role in wider culture. The interest in apocalypticism which was prompted by the turn of the millennium should not be a temporary phase in intellectual life since, as these essays indicate, the wide influence of apocalypticism deserves a central place in theological and historical study.

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Contents

Paul S Fiddes
7
John J Collins
26
Bob Becking
44
Copyright

12 other sections not shown

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About the author (2002)

Judith Kovacs is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia. She is the author of a forthcoming book on the church fathers' interpretation of 1 Corinthians.

Christopher Rowland is Dean Ireland's Professor of Exegesis of Holy Scripture at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Queen's College, Oxford. His previous publications include "The Open Heaven "(1982), "The Book of Revelation "(1998), "Christian Origins" (revised edition, 2002) and "Radical Christian Writings: A Reader" (Blackwell, 2002).

John Barton is Oriel & Laing Professor of the Interpretation of Holy Scripture at the University of Oxford. John Muddiman is G. B. Caird Fellow in New Testament Studies in Mansfield College, Oxford.