Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 1 - 4 of 4 on ... and violence, till the shocks become appalling ; when the thunder is at its loudest,....  
" ... and violence, till the shocks become appalling ; when the thunder is at its loudest, a tremendous gust of wind rushes with incredible and often irresistible vehemence from the darkened part of the horizon, not rarely in its course carrying away roofs... "
A Practical Medico-historical Account of the Western Coast of Africa ... - Page 40
by James Boyle - 1831 - 423 pages
Full view - About this book

the Medico-Chirurgical Review,and Joournal of Practical Medicine.Volume ...

James Johnson,M.D.Edited By. - 1832
...tremendous gust of wind rushes with incredible, and often irresistible vehemence from the darkened part of the horizon, not rarely in its course carrying...up-rooting trees and laying the stiffest and largest ships ou their beam-ends, or sinking them, whether under-weigh or at anchor ; and to that succeeds a furious...
Full view - About this book

The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal: Exhibiting a View of the ..., Volume 13

Robert Jameson - Science - 1832
...a tremendous gust of wind rushes with incredible and often irresistible vehemence from the darkened part of the horizon, not rarely in its course carrying...chimney-tops, blowing down or uprooting trees, and laying the stoutest and largest ships on their beam-ends, or sinking them under weigh or at anchor ; and to that...
Full view - About this book

The Monthly Review

Books - 1832
...a tremendous gust of wind rushes with incredible and often irresistible vehemence from the darkened part of the horizon, not rarely in its course carrying away roofs of houses and chimney pots, blowing down or uprooting trees, and laying the stiffest and largest ships on their beam...
Full view - About this book

The Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal, Volume 37

Medicine - 1832
...a tremendous gust of wind rushes with incredible and often irresistible vehemence from the darkened part of the horizon, not rarely in its course carrying away roofs of houses and chimney tops, blowing down or uprooting trees, and laying the stiffest and largest ships on their beam-ends,...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF