A Savage Mirror: Power, Identity, and Knowledge in Early Modern France

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Stanford University Press, 2006 - History - 306 pages
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A Savage Mirror is about the New World, royal ritual, and the sensibilities that defined a new class of elites. It takes as its starting point the royal entry of Henri II into Rouen in 1550. By all accounts, this ritual was among the most spectacular ever staged. It included an "exact" replica of a Brazilian village, with fifty "savages" kidnapped from the New World. The book aims to understand what the French made of these Brazilian cannibals, and the significance of putting them in a festival honoring the king. The resulting analysis provides an investigation of France's changing social structure, its religious beliefs, its humanist culture, and its complicated commercial and symbolic relations with the New World. The book will appeal not only to scholars of early modern history, but to those interested in cross-cultural contact, cultural studies, civic ritual, museography, and history of literature, science, religion, art, and anthropology.

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Contents

Mirrors Kings and Cannibals
1
The Kings Entry
15
Pleading Their Case in a Silent
21
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

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About the author (2006)

Michael Wintroub is a historian of early modern Europe. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Rhetoric at the University of California, Berkeley.

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