Annual Report of the Adjutant-General ... for the Year Ending ... (Google eBook)

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Wright & Potter, 1863 - United States
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Page 25 - States to aid in the maintenance of the laws and the peace of the Union. His excellency the commander-in-chief therefore orders : That the commanding officer of each company of volunteer militia examine with care the roll of his company, and cause the name of each member, together with his rank and place of residence, to be properly recorded and a copy of the same to be forwarded to the office of the adjutant-general.
Page 25 - States, that they be forthwith discharged, so that their places may be filled by men ready for any public exigency which may arise, whenever called upon. After the above orders shall have been fulfilled, no discharge, either of officer or private, shall be granted, unless for cause satisfactory to the Commander-in-Chief. If any companies have not the number of men allowed by law, the commanders of the same shall make proper exertions to have the vacancies filled, and the men properly drilled and...
Page 27 - ... very great number of apartments of American citizens, and a large amount of American property, I beg leave to call the attention of your excellency to the correspondence upon this subject between Mr. de Thile and Mr. Bancroft. I have the honor to inclose a copy of Mr. de Thile's letter in reply to Mr.
Page 176 - ... at the expiration of which time the disheartening order to fall back was given. We have neither time, space, nor heart, to record in detail the disasters to the Fifteenth on that day. «It was repulsed in common with all other regiments attached to the division. In the history of our State we claim to be mentioned as having...
Page 439 - Clifton, had gone on board the Westfield, and while awaiting his return, in order to get an answer to my request, I saw from the deck of the Owasco our men being marched off prisoners by the enemy. This was done while the flags of truce were still flying at all points. On Captain Law's return he informed me that the gunboats would proceed to sea immediately; so, finding our men had been captured, by advice of naval officers, I remained on board the gunboat and proceeded to New Orleans and reported...
Page 438 - January 1 , 1863, soon after the moon had gone down, our pickets were driven in by the enemy, who were advancing with their artillery. We instantly formed in line on the wharf behind our barricades, and at the same time we signalized the gunboats that the enemy were upon us. The enemy then opened fire on us with his artillery, which was responded to by the gunboats. Our quarters had been a wooden building on the wharf which we had barricaded on the inside. We had also barricaded the wharf in two...
Page 23 - If subsistence cannot be furnished in kind, and board be necessary, it will be furnished at a rate not to exceed forty cents per diem. 4th. Necessary transportation of volunteers prior to completion of company organization and muster into service as a company. After completion of such organization and muster, transportation will be paid by the Quartermaster's Department. Transportation will be at the rate of two cents per mile for railroad travel, and at the current rates for stage and steamboat...
Page 439 - Lane," and on shore. Flags of truce were then raised by the several gunboats, and finally by Colonel Burrell on the wharf. Colonel Burrell not having any information as to the reason of this cessation of firing, then ordered me to go on board the gunboats and find out the object of the flags of truce, and also to get the gunboats to come up to the wharf, and take our men off, the enemy being too strong for us to contend against on shore. I got on board the " Owasco," the " Weslfield " being aground...
Page 176 - It has been the subject of much remark, that troops never went into battle more cheerfully than did ours that morning, so confident were all that the shattered enemy would be driven ere night across the river.
Page 247 - Brigade was ordered to the front, and forming in double line of battle, most gallantly and steadily moved across the plain, swept by the destructive fire of the enemy. When about sixty rods from the city, Color-Sergeant Collins, of Co.

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