Rob Roy (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, May 1, 2007 - Fiction - 496 pages
4 Reviews
Outlaw Rob Roy MacGregor comes alive in this classic epic of the Scottish borderlands. The narrative follows the adventures of Frank Osbaldistone, a businessman’s son who falls out of favor with his father and is sent to stay in Scotland. English and Protestant, Frank has never felt more out of place, but the wild and noble land intrigues him. And he is immediately drawn to the powerful, enigmatic figure of Rob Roy, who, alongside his fiercely passionate wife, fights for justice and dignity for all of Scotland. Twists of plot, a romantic outlaw’s cunning escapes, and uprisings against England make this a classic epic. At the same time, Frank’s fervent but forbidden love for a Catholic girl makes it a breathtaking romance. Combine these elements with superb period detail, and one has an incomparable portrait of the haunted Highlands, a legendary hero, and a glorious Scottish past.
  
With a New Introduction by Caroline McCracken-Flesher and an Afterword by A. N. Wilson
  

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: Rob Roy (Waverley Novels #4)

User Review  - Laurel Hicks - Goodreads

The Scottish novel. Sir Walter warms my heart. Read full review

Review: Rob Roy (Waverley Novels #4)

User Review  - Kathy - Goodreads

This fell in the category of classics I feel I should have read. It also reinforced my belief that people used to be much more willing to spend a lot of time reading a book. Quite long, but a good story. Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER I
1
CHAPTER II
9
CHAPTER III
21
CHAPTER IV
28
CHAPTER V
36
CHAPTER VI
45
CHAPTER VII
57
CHAPTER VIII
66
CHAPTER XXI
189
CHAPTER XXII
198
CHAPTER XXIII
210
CHAPTER XXIV
220
CHAPTER XXV
226
CHAPTER XXVI
235
CHAPTER XXVII
252
CHAPTER XXVIII
260

CHAPTER IX
77
CHAPTER X
91
CHAPTER XI
102
CHAPTER XII
111
CHAPTER XIII
119
CHAPTER XIV
130
CHAPTER XV
141
CHAPTER XVI
147
CHAPTER XVII
154
CHAPTER XVIII
163
CHAPTER XIX
174
CHAPTER XX
180
CHAPTER XXIX
274
CHAPTER XXX
283
CHAPTER XXXI
297
CHAPTER XXXII
310
CHAPTER XXXIII
322
CHAPTER XXXIV
332
CHAPTER XXXV
347
CHAPTER XXXVI
359
CHAPTER XXXVII
367
CHAPTER XXXVIII
378
CHAPTER XXXIX
387
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About the author (2007)

Sir Walter Scott was born in Edinburgh in 1771. Educated for the law, he obtained the office of sheriff-depute of Selkirkshire in 1799 and in 1806 the office of clerk of session, a post whose duties he fulfilled for some twenty-five years. His lifelong interest in Scottish antiquity and the ballads which recorded Scottish history led him to try his hand at narrative poems of adventure and action. The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810) made his reputation as one of the leading poets of his time. A novel, Waverley, which he had begun in 1805, was published anonymously in 1814. Subsequent novels appeared with the note “by the author of Waverley”; hence his novels often are called collectively “the Waverley novels.” Some of the most famous of these are Old Mortality (1816), Rob Roy (1817), Ivanhoe (1819), Kenilworth (1821), and Quentin Durward (1823). In recognition of his literary work Scott was made a baronet in 1819. During his last years he held various official positions and published biographies, editions of Swift and Dryden, tales, lyric poetry, and various studies of history and antiquity. He died in 1832.

A. N. WILSON is the author of biographies on Jesus, Milton, Tolstoy, C. S. Lewis and Dante. His acclaimed histories, The Victorians and God s Funeral, have made him an authority on Victorian-era Great Britain. A former columnist for the London Evening Standard, he now contributes to the Times Literary Supplement, New Statesman, the Spectator, the Observer and the Daily Mail.

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