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" His contractors, who regarded him as the most efficient and capable foreman in their employ previous to his injury, considered the change in his mind so marked that they would not give him his place again. "
Psychology and Common Life: A Survey of the Present Results of Psychical ... - Page 8
by Frank Sargent Hoffman - 1903 - 286 pages
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Appletons' Annual Cyclopaedia and Register of Important ..., Volume 8; Volume 23

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1884
...more or less intellectual disturbance, and on this point the history by Dr. Iliirlow is conclusive : " His contractors, who regarded him as the most efficient...could not give him his place again. The equilibrium of balance, so to speak, between his intellectual faculties and animal propensities seems to have been...
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Appletons' Annual Cyclopaedia and Register of Important ..., Volume 8; Volume 23

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1884
...intellectual disturbance, and on this point the history by Dr. Harlow is conclusive : " His eontractors, who regarded him as the most efficient and capable...could not give him his place again. The equilibrium of balance, so to speak, between his intellectual faculties and animal propensities seems to have been...
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Glasgow Medical Journal

Medical - 1898
...Bramwell in 1888, points out that this was not quite accurate. Dr. Harlow is quoted in these terms : " His contractors, who regarded him as the most efficient...marked that they could not give him his place again. . . . Previous to his injury, though untrained in the schools, he possessed a wellbalanced mind, and...
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The Mental Functions of the Brain: An Investigation Into Their Localisation ...

Bernard Hollander - Brain - 1901 - 512 pages
...twelve years and a half afterwards. This is what Dr. Harlow says as to the patient's mental condition : His contractors, who regarded him as the most efficient...considered the change in his mind so marked that they would not give him his place again. The equilibrium or balance, so to speak, between his intellectual...
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The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Volume 123

Medicine - 1902
...oculi ; no other muscular impairment, physical health good ; applied for employment, but his employers considered the change in his mind so marked that they could not give him his place again. He is fitful, irreverent, indulging at times in the grossest profanity (which was not previously his...
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Appletons' Annual Cyclopaedia and Register of Important ..., Volume 8; Volume 23

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1884
...more oi*less intellectual disturbance, and on this point the history by Dr. Harlow is conclusive : " His contractors, who regarded him as the most efficient...in their employ previous to his injury, considered tho change in his mind so marked that they could not give him his placo again. Tho equilibrium of balance,...
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Classic Cases in Neuropsychology

Christopher Code - Psychology - 1996 - 385 pages
...Gage never regained his job as foreman. Twenty years later. Harlow explained that his contractors: "considered the change in his mind so marked that they could not give him his place again" 1Harlow. 1868. 1869). ln about 160 words. Harlow set out the basis for their decision: The equilibrium...
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Classic Cases in Neuropsychology, Volume 1

Christopher Code - Psychology - 1996 - 385 pages
...businessman, very energetic and persistent in executing all his plans of operation. His contractors "regarded him as the most efficient and capable foreman in their employ." I have found it extraordinarily difficult to extend this meagre baseline. Phineas P. Gage was probably...
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Phineas Gage: A Gruesome But True Story about Brain Science

John Fleischman - Juvenile Nonfiction - 2004 - 86 pages
Tells the story of Phineas Gage, a railroad construction foreman who survived eleven years years after an accident in which a thirteen-pound iron rod shot through his brain.
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An Odd Kind of Fame: Stories of Phineas Gage

Malcolm Macmillan - Medical - 2002 - 576 pages
...regained his job as foreman. Twenty years after the accident Harlow explained that his contractors: considered the change in his mind so marked that they could not give him his place again. In about 160 words, Harlow set out the basis for their decision: The equilibrium or balance, so to...
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