Japanese Rinzai Zen Buddhism

Front Cover
BRILL, 2008 - Religion - 314 pages
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Zen Buddhist ideas and practices in many ways are unique within the study of religion, and artists, poets and Buddhists practitioners worldwide have found inspiration from this tradition. Until recent years, representations of Zen Buddhism have focussed almost entirely on philosophical, historical or a oespirituala aspects. This book investigates the contemporary living reality of the largest Japanese Rinzai Zen Buddhist group, MyAshinji. Drawing on textual studies and ethnographic fieldwork, JA, rn Borup analyses how its practitioners use and understand their religion, how they practice their religiosity and how different kinds of Zen Buddhists (monks, nuns, priest, lay people) interact and define themselves within the religious organization. Japanese Rinzai Zen Buddhism portrays a living Zen Buddhism being both uniquely interesting and interestingly typical for common Buddhist and Japanese religiosity.
  

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Contents

Institution history and structure
7
Chapter Two Zen Buddhists
49
Chapter Three Zen religious practice
101
Installing the master
177
Installing the priest
179
Initiating the dead
183
Structure and semantics of clerical rites of passage
184
36 Lay and clerical rituals
186
37 Summary
273
Chapter Four Conclusion
277
Appendix
289
Bibliography
299
Index
313
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About the author (2008)

Jørn Borup (b. 1966) Ph.D. (2002) and M.A. in The Study of Religion and Japanese, is assistant professor at Aarhus University, Denmark. He has published on Buddhism in Japan and Denmark, mainly in Danish.

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