The Critical Review, Or, Annals of Literature (Google eBook)

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W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, 1808 - English literature
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Page 23 - ... apiece, so that he brought them up in godliness and fear of God. He kept hospitality for his poor neighbours, and some alms he gave to the poor. And all this he did of the said farm, where he that now hath it payeth sixteen pound by year or more, and is not able to do anything for his prince, for himself, nor for his children, or give a cup of drink to the poor.
Page 334 - Soul of the age! The applause, delight, the wonder of our stage! My Shakespeare, rise! I will not lodge thee by Chaucer, or Spenser, or bid Beaumont lie A little further, to make thee a room: Thou art a monument without a tomb, And art alive still while thy book doth live And we have wits to read and praise to give.
Page 334 - This figure that thou here seest put, It was for gentle Shakespeare cut, Wherein the graver had a strife With nature, to out-do the life. O, could he but have drawn his wit As well in brass as he hath hit His face the print would then surpass All that was ever writ in brass. But since he cannot, Reader, look Not on his picture, but his book.
Page 23 - In my time my poor father was as diligent to teach me to shoot as to learn (me) any other thing ; and so, I think, other men did their children. He taught me how to draw, how to lay my body in my bow, and not to draw with strength of arms, as other nations do, but with strength of the body.
Page 23 - My father was a yeoman, and had no lands of his own, only he had a farm of three or four pound by year at the uttermost, and hereupon he tilled so much as kept half a dozen men. He had walk for a hundred sheep ; and my mother milked thirty kine. He was able, and did find the king a harness, with himself and his horse, while he came to the place that he should receive the king's wages. I can remember that I buckled his harness when he went unto Blackheath field. He kept me to school, or else I had...
Page 53 - ... a creditor has an insurable interest in the life of his debtor, at least where he has only the personal security of the debtor
Page 356 - He then embraced his friends, gave some tokens of remembrance to his son-in-law, Lord Maitland, for his daughter . and grand-children, stript himself of part of his apparel, of which he likewise made presents, and laid his head upon the block. Having uttered a short prayer, he gave the signal to the executioner, which was instantly obeyed, and his head severed from, his body.
Page 23 - I think other men did their children: he taught me how to draw, how to lay my body in my bow, and not to draw with strength .of arms as divers other nations do, but with strength of the body. I had my bows bought me according to my age and strength ; as...
Page 178 - THE Church hath power to decree Rites or Ceremonies, and authority in Controversies of Faith : And yet it is not lawful for the Church to ordain any thing that is contrary to God's Word written, neither may it so expound one place of Scripture, that it be repugnant to another.
Page 23 - He married my sisters with five pound, or twenty nobles apiece, so that he brought them up in godliness and fear of God. He kept hospitality for his poor neighbours, and some alms he gave to the poor. And all this he did...

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