The Prose Edda: Norse Mythology (Google eBook)

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Digireads.com Publishing, Jan 1, 2004 - Fiction
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Contents

IV
21
VII
23
VIII
27
IX
29
XI
30
XIII
34
XV
40
XVI
42
XXXI
66
XXXIII
68
XXXIV
69
XXXVII
72
XXXVIII
77
XXXIX
80
XL
81
XLI
82

XVII
43
XIX
44
XX
47
XXII
49
XXIII
55
XXIV
58
XXVI
62
XXVIII
64
XXIX
65
XLII
88
XLIV
93
XLV
95
XLVII
96
XLVIII
106
XLIX
107
L
120
LIII
123
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About the author (2004)

Snorri Sturluson's fame as a historian---his main work is the 16 sagas included in Heimskringla (c.1230), a monumental history of Norway from its beginning until 1177---lies both in his critical approach to sources and in his fine, realistic exposition of event and motivation. A similar combination of scholarly and imaginative talent is seen in The Prose Edda (c.1220). Intended to be a handbook in skaldic poetry, it preserves invaluable mythological tales that were on the verge of being forgotten even in Sturluson's time. A large part of what we know about Nordic mythology stems from his Edda. The bibliography that follows also lists the anonymous Egil's Saga (1200--30), which many expert Scandinavian medievalists (e.g., Sigurdur Nordal and Bjorn M. Olsen) attribute to Sturluson. It is a fascinating account of life in Norway, England, and Iceland and of the poet-warrior Egil, whose skaldic verse is renowned for its unusual emotional and personal qualities. Snorri Sturluson's own life was as eventful as those about whom he wrote. Returning to Iceland from exile in 1239, he again became deeply involved in serious power struggles and was murdered in 1241.

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