Spinors and Space-Time: Volume 1, Two-Spinor Calculus and Relativistic Fields

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 5, 1987 - Mathematics - 472 pages
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This volume introduces and systematically develops the calculus of 2-spinors. This is the first detailed exposition of this technique which leads not only to a deeper understanding of the structure of space-time, but also provides shortcuts to some very tedious calculations. Many results are given here for the first time.
  

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Contents

II
1
III
8
IV
24
V
32
VI
41
VII
56
VIII
68
IX
76
XXVII
242
XXVIII
245
XXIX
246
XXX
250
XXXI
262
XXXII
267
XXXIII
285
XXXIV
312

X
91
XI
98
XII
103
XIII
116
XIV
125
XV
132
XVI
147
XVII
159
XVIII
167
XIX
179
XX
190
XXI
201
XXII
210
XXIII
223
XXIV
231
XXV
237
XXVI
240
XXXV
325
XXXVI
328
XXXVII
332
XXXVIII
342
XXXIX
352
XL
362
XLI
366
XLII
371
XLIII
373
XLIV
385
XLV
393
XLVI
424
XLVII
435
XLVIII
445
XLIX
457
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About the author (1987)

Born in England, the son of a geneticist, Roger Penrose received a Ph.D. in 1957 from Cambridge University. Penrose then became a professor of applied mathematics at Birkbeck College in 1966 and a Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics at Oxford University in 1973. Penrose, a mathematician and theoretical physicist, has done much to elucidate the fundamental properties of black holes. With Stephen Hawking, Penrose proved a theorem of Albert Einstein's general relativity, asserting that at the center of a black hole there must evolve a "space-time singularity" of zero volume and infinite density, in which the current laws of physics do not apply. He also proposed the hypothesis of "cosmic censorship," which claims that such singularities must possess an event horizon. In 1969 Penrose described a process for the extraction of energy from a black hole, as well as how rotational energy of the black hole is transferred to a particle outside the hole. In addition, Penrose has done much to develop the mathematics needed to unite general relativity, which deals with the gravitational interactions of matter, and quantum mechanics, which describes all other interactions.

Professor Wolfgang Rindler
Department of Physics
The University of Texas at Dallas
Richardson, TX 75083-0688
USA

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