The Federalist: A Commentary on the Constitution of the United States : Being a Collection of Essays Written in Support of the Constitution Agreed Upon September 17, 1787, by the Federal Convention (Google eBook)

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Henry Cabot Lodge
G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1892 - Constitutional law - 586 pages
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Page 557 - Congress assembled, shall have the sole and exclusive right and power of determining on peace and war, except in the cases mentioned in the sixth article: of sending and receiving ambassadors: entering into treaties and alliances: provided that no treaty of commerce shall be made whereby the legislative power of the respective States shall be restrained from imposing such imposts and duties on foreigners as their own people are subjected to, or from prohibiting the exportation or importation of any...
Page 265 - The better to secure and perpetuate mutual friendship and intercourse among the people of the different States in this Union, the free inhabitants of each of these States, paupers, vagabonds and fugitives from justice excepted, shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of free citizens...
Page 564 - To borrow money on the credit of the United States ; To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several States, and with the Indian tribes ; To establish a uniform rule of naturalization, and uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies, throughout the United States ; To coin money, regulate the value thereof, and of...
Page 55 - When a majority is included in a faction, the form of popular government, on the other hand, enables it to sacrifice to its ruling passion or interest both the public good and the rights of other citizens. To secure the public good and private rights against the danger of such a faction, and at the same time to preserve the spirit and the form of popular government, is then the great object to which our inquiries are directed.
Page 558 - States; regulating the trade and managing all affairs with the Indians not members of any of the States provided that the legislative right of any State within its own limits be not infringed or violated...
Page 559 - The United States, in Congress assembled, shall have authority to appoint a committee, to sit in the recess of Congress, to be denominated " A Committee of the States," and to consist of one delegate from each state, and to appoint such other committees and civil officers as may be necessary for managing the general affairs of the United States under their...
Page 557 - All charges of war and all other expenses that shall be incurred for the common defence or general welfare, and allowed by the United States in congress assembled, shall be defrayed out of a common treasury, which shall be supplied by the several states in proportion to the value of all land within each state...
Page 559 - States under their direction; to appoint one of their number to preside; provided that no person be .allowed to serve in the office of president more than one year in any term of three years; to ascertain the necessary sums of money to be raised for the service of the United States...
Page 485 - The interpretation of the laws is the proper and peculiar province of the Courts. A Constitution is, in fact, and must be regarded by the Judges, as a fundamental law. It therefore belongs to them to ascertain its meaning, as well as the meaning of any particular Act proceeding from the Legislative body.
Page 154 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.

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