Sir Richard Whittington: Lord Mayor of London (Google eBook)

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G.P. Putnam's sons, 1881 - London (England) - 222 pages
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Page 130 - how Alphonso, a Portuguese, being wrecked on the coast of Guinney, and being presented by the king thereof with his weight in gold for a cat to kill their mice, and an oyntment to kill their flies, which he improved, within five years, to 6000 on the place, and returning to Portugal, after fifteen years traffick, became the third man in the kingdom.
Page 148 - Lancaster was overheard, or thought to be overheard, as if he threatened to drag the Bishop out of the church by the hair of his head. The populace were inflamed by the insult to the Bishop, the insult to the City of London.
Page 16 - And the City of London shall have all its ancient liberties and free customs, as well by land as by water; furthermore we will and grant, that all other cities and boroughs, and towns and ports, shall have all their liberties and free customs.
Page 224 - Bibles," &c. With Four full-page Illustrations and numerous smaller Engravings. Post 8vo Cloth boards 2 6 JEWISH NATION (A HISTORY OF THE), from the Earliest Times to the Present Day. By EH PALMER, Esq., MA, Fellow of St. John's College, and Lord Almoner's Professor of Arabic in the University of Cambridge, author of the "Desert of the Exodus,
Page 96 - And good beginning of the yeare they wishe and wishe againe, According to the auncient guise of heathen people vaine. These eight days no man doth require his dettes of any man, Their tables do they furnish out with all the meate they can : With marchpaynes, tartes, and custards great, they drink with staring eyes, They rowte and revell, feede and feaste, as merry all as pyes : As if they should at th entrance of this New Yeare hap to die, Yet would they have their bellies full, and auncient friends...
Page 93 - I think there is no city that hath more approved customs, either in frequenting the churches, honouring God's ordinances, observing holidays, giving alms, entertaining strangers, fulfilling contracts, solemnising marriages, setting out feasts and welcoming the guests, celebrating funerals, or burying the dead.
Page 33 - And all his bokis howndis were, And I myself a joly huntere ; To blow my horn I wold not spare ; For if he were dede I coold not care.
Page 214 - Richard said, he would endeavour to make one still more agreeable to his majesty, and immediately tore, and threw into the fire, the. king's bond for 10,000 marks, due to the company of mercers ; 12,500 to the chamber of London ; 12,000 to the grocers ; to the staplers, goldsmiths, haberdashers, vintners, brewers, and bakers, 3000 marks each.
Page 208 - ... ordered him to bring his cat ; which he did, but with great reluctance, fancying nothing would come of it. He with tears delivered it to the master of the ship, which was called the "Unicorn...
Page 205 - This put him almost into despair, so he laid him down on the ground, being unable to go any farther. In the meantime, Mr. Fitzwarren, whose house it was, came from the Royal Exchange, and, seeing him there in that condition, demanded what he wanted, and sharply told him, if he did not immediately depart, he would cause him to be sent to the house of correction, calling him a lazy fellow.

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