Fires of Eden

Front Cover
Harper Prism, Jul 27, 1995 - Fiction - 408 pages
14 Reviews
By overdeveloping Mauna Pele, a resort on the Kona Coast of Hawaii, billionaire Byron Trumbo has unwittingly reopened a centuries-old battle between Pele, goddess of volcanoes, and her immortal enemies. Giants are being spotted, guests turn up dead and dismembered, volcanoes erupt and send lava flowing close to the resort, and Byron must face the wrath of his enemies.

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Review: Fires of Eden

User Review  - Peter Greenwell - Goodreads

Two thirds of this novel are very good. The last third ventures into ludicrous territory. With that out of the way, it was good to see Cordie Stumpf nee Cooke back in action. There wasn't enough of ... Read full review

Review: Fires of Eden

User Review  - Elise M. - Goodreads

Not Dan Simmons's best. I found the descriptions of the volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and lava flows repetitive. Byron Trumbo and his wives were caricatures. The best, most sympathetic character was Cordie Strumpf, full of spirit and a take-no-prisoners attitude toward life. A worthy heroine. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
11
Section 3
19
Copyright

21 other sections not shown

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About the author (1995)

Science fiction writer Dan Simmons was born in East Peoria, Illinois in 1948. He graduated from Wabash College in 1970 and received an M. A. from Washington University the following year. Simmons was an elementary school teacher and worked in the education field for a decade, including working to develop a gifted education program. His first successful short story was won a contest and was published in 1982. His first novel, Song of Kali, won a World Fantasy Award, and Simmons has also won a Theodore Sturgeon Award for short fiction, four Bram Stoker Awards, and eight Locus Awards. He is also the author of the Hyperion series, and Simmons and his work have been compared to Herbert's Dune and Asimov's Foundation series.

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