Introduction to Quantum Mechanics: With Applications to Chemistry

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 1985 - Science - 468 pages
7 Reviews

When this classic text was first published in 1935, it fulfilled the goal of its authors "to produce a textbook of practical quantum mechanics for the chemist, the experimental physicist, and the beginning student of theoretical physics." Although many who are teachers today once worked with the book as students, the text is still as valuable for the same undergraduate audience.
Two-time Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling, Research Professor at the Linus Pauling Institute of Science and Medicine, Palo Alto, California, and E. Bright Wilson, Jr., Professor Emeritus of Chemistry at Harvard University, provide a readily understandable study of "wave mechanics," discussing the Schrodinger wave equation and the problems which can be solved with it. Extensive knowledge of mathematics is not required, although the student must have a grasp of elementary mathematics through the calculus. Pauling and Wilson begin with a survey of classical mechanics, including Newton's equations of motion in the Lagrangian form, and then move on to the "old" quantum theory, developed through the work of Planck, Einstein and Bohr. This analysis leads to the heart of the book ― an explanation of quantum mechanics which, as Schrodinger formulated it, "involves the renunciation of the hope of describing in exact detail the behavior of a system." Physics had created a new realm in which classical, Newtonian certainties were replaced by probabilities ― a change which Heisenberg's uncertainty principle (described in this book) subsequently reinforced.
With clarity and precision, the authors guide the student from topic to topic, covering such subjects as the wave functions for the hydrogen atom, perturbation theory, the Pauli exclusion principle, the structure of simple and complex molecules, Van der Waals forces, and systems in thermodynamic equilibrium. To insure that the student can follow the mathematical derivations, Pauling and Wilson avoid the "temptation to condense the various discussions into shorter and perhaps more elegant forms" appropriate for a more advanced audience. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics is a perfect vehicle for demonstrating the practical application of quantum mechanics to a broad spectrum of chemical and physical problems.

  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
4
4 stars
2
3 stars
1
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - hcubic - LibraryThing

A classic, largely responsible for the introduction of quantum chemistry pedagogy in the US. Still holds up after 70 years. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - wweisser - LibraryThing

This book could not have a more descriptive title. Well written and clear. Read full review

Contents

III
1
IV
2
V
4
VI
6
VII
7
VIII
9
IX
11
X
14
XCV
244
XCVI
246
XCVII
247
XCVIII
249
XCIX
250
CI
252
CII
254
CIII
256

XI
16
XII
17
XIII
21
XIV
23
XV
25
XVI
26
XVII
28
XVIII
29
XIX
30
XX
31
XXI
32
XXII
33
XXIII
34
XXIV
36
XXVI
43
XXVII
45
XXVIII
47
XXIX
50
XXX
53
XXXI
56
XXXII
58
XXXIII
63
XXXIV
64
XXXV
65
XXXVI
67
XXXVII
73
XXXVIII
77
XXXIX
84
XL
85
XLI
86
XLII
88
XLIII
90
XLIV
95
XLV
100
XLVI
103
XLVII
105
XLVIII
113
L
117
LI
118
LII
121
LIII
124
LIV
125
LV
126
LVI
127
LVII
129
LIX
131
LX
132
LXI
139
LXII
142
LXIII
146
LXIV
151
LXVI
156
LXVII
160
LXVIII
162
LXIX
165
LXX
172
LXXI
176
LXXII
177
LXXIII
180
LXXIV
184
LXXV
186
LXXVII
189
LXXVIII
191
LXXX
198
LXXXI
201
LXXXII
202
LXXXIII
204
LXXXIV
207
LXXXV
210
LXXXVI
214
LXXXVII
221
LXXXVIII
225
LXXXIX
226
XC
230
XCII
233
XCIII
235
XCIV
239
CV
257
CVI
259
CVII
263
CVIII
264
CIX
266
CX
267
CXI
271
CXII
275
CXIV
280
CXV
282
CXVII
290
CXVIII
292
CXIX
294
CXX
299
CXXI
302
CXXII
306
CXXIV
309
CXXV
312
CXXVI
313
CXXVII
314
CXXVIII
315
CXXIX
318
CXXX
322
CXXXI
326
CXXXII
327
CXXXIV
331
CXXXV
333
CXXXVI
340
CXXXVII
345
CXXXVIII
349
CXXXIX
351
CXL
353
CXLI
355
CXLII
358
CXLIII
361
CXLIV
362
CXLV
366
CXLVIII
368
CXLIX
369
CL
370
CLI
372
CLII
374
CLIII
377
CLIV
380
CLV
381
CLVI
383
CLVII
384
CLVIII
387
CLX
388
CLXI
390
CLXII
391
CLXIII
394
CLXIV
395
CLXV
396
CLXVI
397
CLXVII
399
CLXVIII
402
CLXIX
405
CLXX
408
CLXXI
412
CLXXIII
416
CLXXVI
417
CLXXVII
421
CLXXVIII
425
CLXXIX
428
CLXXX
432
CLXXXI
436
CLXXXII
439
CLXXXIII
440
CLXXXIV
441
CLXXXV
443
CLXXXVII
446
CLXXXVIII
448
CLXXXIX
451
CXC
453
CXCI
455
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1985)

Linus Pauling: Two-Time Nobel Laureate
In 1985 Dover reprinted Introduction to Quantum Mechanics with Applications to Chemistry, a well-known older book by Linus Pauling and E. Bright Wilson. This book had been first published fifty years earlier and remarkably still found readers in 1985, and still does today, twenty-five years further on.

The first edition of Pauling's General Chemistry was a short book of lessr than 250 pages published in 1944, during World War II. Three years later, it had more than doubled in size to almost 600 pages, and the 1953 edition was over 700 pages. Fifteen years later, for the 1970 edition, it reached its final size and configuration at almost 1,000 pages ― and that is the edition which Dover reprinted in 1988. Dr. Pauling's one request at that time was that we keep the price affordable for students.

Linus Pauling is of course the only Dover author to win two Nobel prizes, for Chemistry in 1954 and for Peace in 1962; he is the only winner in history of two unshared Nobel Prizes.

In the Author's Own Words:
"Satisfaction of one's curiosity is one of the greatest sources of happiness in life."

"Do unto others 20% better than you would expect them to do unto you, to correct for subjective error."

"The way to get good ideas is to get lots of ideas, and throw the bad ones away."

"Facts are the air of scientists. Without them you can never fly." Linus Pauling

Critical Acclaim for General Chemistry:
"An excellent text, highly recommended." Choice

Bibliographic information