Writing

Front Cover
Lumen Editions, 1998 - Literary Collections - 91 pages
10 Reviews
"Written in the splendid bareness of her late style, these pages are Marguerite Duras's theory of literature. Comparing a dying fly to the work of style; remembering the trance and incurable disarray of writing; recreating the last moments of a British pilot shot during World War II; or else letting out a magisterial 'So what?' to question six decades of story telling, all operate as an indispensable confession. The final literary testament of one of the greatest French writers of the twentieth century."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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Review: Writing

User Review  - Steve Turtell - Goodreads

I didn't jump on the Duras bandwagon in the wake of the astonishing success of The Lover, primarily because of her connection with the Nouveau roman, which I find tedious and pretentious. In grad ... Read full review

Review: Writing

User Review  - Graciela - Goodreads

Not as good as I expected it. It was recommended to me as a great book for those interested in writing. I read the French original version. The book seems to be a compilation of thoughts or of ... Read full review

Contents

Writing
1
The Death of the Young British Pilot
35
Roma
57
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Marguerite Duras was born in Gia-Dinh, Indochina on April 4, 1914. After attending school in Saigon, she moved to Paris, France to study law and political science. After graduation, she worked as a secretary in the French Ministry of the Colonies until 1941. During World War II, she joined the Resistance and published her first books. After the liberation, she became a member of the French Communist Party, and though she later resigned, she always described herself as a Marxist. Her first book, Les Impudents, was published in 1943. During her lifetime, she wrote more than 70 novels, plays, screenplays and adaptations. Her novels include The Sea Wall, The Lover, The Lover from Northern China, The War, and That's All. In 1959, she wrote her first film scenario, Hiroshima, Mon Amour, and has since been involved in a number of other films, including India Song, Baxter, Vera Baxter, Le Camion (The Truck), and The Lover. She died on March 4, 1996 at the age of 81.

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