The Home We Build Together: Recreating Society

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Bloomsbury Academic, Dec 30, 2007 - Religion - 288 pages
4 Reviews

Arguing that global communications have fragmented national cultures and that multiculturalism, intended to reduce social friction, is today reinforcing it, Sacks calls for a new approach to national identity. He envisions a responsibility-based rather than rights-based model of citizenship that connects the ideas of giving and belonging. We should see society as "the home we build together", bringing the distinctive gifts of different groups to the common good. Sacks warns of the hazards free and open societies face in the 21st century, and offers an unusual religious defence of liberal democracy and the nation state.

This logical sequel to Sacks' award-winning The Dignity of Difference (Continuum), The Home We Build Together makes a compelling case for "integrated diversity" within a framework of shared political values.

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Review: The Home We Build Together: Recreating Society

User Review  - Ronen - Goodreads

The book tackles a difficult subject - the tension between integration and segregation, multi-culturalism as opposed to integrated societies. One of the best analysis' of the subject I've come across ... Read full review

Review: The Home We Build Together: Recreating Society

User Review  - Andrew Call - Goodreads

Great book on cultural impacts on communities/ countries. Definetly not a quick read but thought provoking. Read full review

Contents

Society as Country House Hotel or Home
13
A Brief History of Multiculturalism
25
The Defeat of Freedom in the Name of Freedom
37
Copyright

16 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

Sir Jonathan Sacks is Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of Britain and the Commonwealth. He is the author of numerous books, including Celebrating Life, From Optimism to Hope, The Persistence of Faith and The Dignity of Difference, for which he won a Grawemeyer Award in Religion.

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