An historical and topographical description of Chelsea, and its environs (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1810
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 116 - The rest to some faint meaning make pretence, But Shadwell never deviates into sense.
Page 315 - A man so various, that he seemed to be Not one, but all mankind's epitome : Stiff in opinions, always in the wrong, Was everything by starts, and nothing long; But, in the course of one revolving moon, Was chemist, fiddler, statesman, and buffoon ; Then all for women, painting, rhyming, drinking, Besides ten thousand freaks that died in thinking.
Page 315 - In the worst inn's worst room, with mat half-hung, The floors of plaster, and the walls of dung, On once a flock-bed, but repair'd with straw, With tape-tied curtains, never meant to draw, The George and Garter dangling from that bed Where tawdry yellow strove with dirty red, Great Villiers lies alas!
Page 280 - I pray you Master Lieutenant, see me safe up, and for my coming down let me shift for myself.
Page 369 - Seen him, uneumber'd with the venal tribe, Smile without art, and win without a bribe. Would he oblige me? let me only find, He does not think me what he thinks mankind.
Page 270 - There is not any man living so loving to his children as he ; and he loveth his old wife as well as if she were a young maid...
Page 348 - For these reasons she endeared him to her own company, and continued with him in Oxford four years ; in which time her great and harmless wit, her cheerful gravity, and her obliging behaviour, gained her an acquaintance and friendship with most of any eminent worth or learning that were at that time in or near that university ; and particularly with Mr. John Donne, who then came accidentally to that place in this time of her being there.
Page 273 - I find his Grace my very good Lord indeed, and I believe he doth as singularly favour me as any subject within this realm ; howbeit, son Roper, I may tell thee, I have no cause to be proud thereof ; for if my head would win him a castle in France (for then there was war between us) it should not fail to go.
Page 396 - A thousand feet rustled on mats, A carpet that once had been green ; Men bow'd with their outlandish hats, With corners so fearfully keen ! Fair maids, who at home in their haste Had left all clothing else but a train, Swept the floor clean, as slowly they pac'd And then - walk'd round and swept it again.
Page 271 - He suffered none to give themselves to cards or dice. The men abode on one side of the house, the women on the other, seldom conversing together. He used before bedtime to call them together, and say certain prayers with them.

Bibliographic information