Junius: Stat nominis umbra, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Printed for Henry Sampson Woodfall, 1772 - Great Britain
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Page 165 - ... as the encroachments of prerogative. He would be as little capable of bargaining with the minister for places for himself or his dependents, as of descending to mix himself in the intrigues of opposition.
Page 78 - First lived and died a hypocrite. Charles the Second was a hypocrite of another sort, and should have died upon the same scaffold. At the distance of a century, we see their different characters happily revived and blended in your Grace. Sullen and severe, without religion, profligate without gaiety, you live like Charles the Second, without being an amiable companion; and, for aught I know, may die as his father did, without the reputation of a martyr.
Page 164 - ... which he might have acquired, not only in parliament, but through the whole kingdom : compare these glorious distinctions with the...
Page 23 - ... This, sir, is the detail. In one view, behold a nation overwhelmed with debt ; her revenues wasted ; her trade declining ; the affections of her colonies alienated ; the duty of the magistrate transferred to the soldiery ; a gallant army, which never fought unwillingly but against their fellowsubjects, mouldering away for want of the direction of a man of common abilities and spirit...
Page 162 - Cautious therefore of giving offence where you have so little deserved it, I shall leave the illustration of your virtues to other hands. Your friends have a privilege to play upon the easiness of your temper, or possibly they are better acquainted with your good qualities than I am.
Page 101 - His views and situation required a creature void of all these properties ; and he was forced to go through every division, resolution, composition, and refinement of political chemistry, before he happily arrived at the caput mortuum of vitriol in your Grace. Flat and insipid in your retired state, but, brought into action, you become vitriol again. Such are the extremes of alternate indolence or fury which have governed your whole administration.
Page 99 - You have now carried things too far to retreat. You have plainly declared to the people what they are to expect from the continuance of your administration.
Page iv - Let it be impressed upon your minds, let it be instilled into your children, that the liberty of the press is the palladium of all the civil, political, and religious rights of an Englishman...
Page 104 - WITH what force, my Lord, with what protection, are you prepared to meet the united detestation of the people of England ? The city of London has given a generous example to the kingdom, in what manner a King of this country ought to be...
Page 5 - It is not the disorder, but the physician it is not a casual concurrence of calamitous circumstances, it is the pernicious hand of government which alone can make a whole people desperate.

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