Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Jun 7, 2005 - Fiction - 160 pages
108 Reviews
This dramatic autobiography of the early life of an American slave was first published in 1845, when its young author had just achieved his freedom. Douglass' eloquence gives a clear indication of the powerful principles that led him to become the first great African-American leader in the United States.
  

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Review: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (The Autobiographies #1)

User Review  - Diane - Goodreads

What a powerful piece of writing this is. Slavery is such an ugly part of American history, and this narrative tells all of the ordeals that Frederick Douglass had to overcome, including whippings ... Read full review

Review: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (The Autobiographies #1)

User Review  - John Pistelli - Goodreads

Revisiting this for the American literature survey I'm teaching; it's been about a decade. Upon rereading, what stands out is Douglass's careful attention to the social dimension of slave resistance ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER I
19
CHAPTER II
25
CHAPTER III
32
CHAPTER IV
37
CHAPTER V
42
CHAPTER VI
47
CHAPTER VII
51
CHAPTER VIII
58
CHAPTER IX
64
CHAPTER X
70
CHAPTER XI
106
APPENDIX
122
AFTERWORD
129
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
141
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey (Frederick Douglass) was born a slave in Talbot County, Maryland. He took the name Douglass after escaping from the South in 1838.

As a leader in the abolitionist movement, Douglass was famed for his eloquent yet incisive political writing. And, like his near-contemporary, Booker T. Washington, understood the central importance of education in improving the lives of African Americans, and was therefore an early proponent of desegregation.

A firm believer in equal rights for all, Douglass attended a meeting of the National Council of Women in Washington, D.C., in the hours before his death in February 1895.

Bibliographic information