History of Philip's War, Commonly Called the Great Indian War, of 1675 and 1676: Also, of the French and Indian Wars at the Eastward, in 1689, 1690, 1692, 1696, and 1704 (Google eBook)

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Thomas B. Watt and Son, 1827 - America - 360 pages
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Page 146 - Like leaves on trees the race of man is found, Now green in youth, now withering on the ground; Another race the following spring supplies; They fall successive, and successive rise: So generations in their course decay; So flourish these, when those are pass'd away.
Page 296 - Having undertaken for the Glory of God. and Advancement of the Christian Faith, and the Honour of our King and Country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern Parts of Virginia; do by these Presents, solemnly and mutually in the Presence of God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil Body Politick, for our better Ordering and Preservation, and Furtherance of the Ends aforesaid...
Page 209 - Philip and Mary, by the grace of God king and queen of England, France, Naples, Jerusalem, and Ireland, defenders of the faith, princes of Spain and Sicily, archdukes of Austria, dukes of Meloyne, Burgoyne, and Brabant, counts of Hapsburg, Flanders, and Tyrol...
Page 293 - To be short, after they had been thus turmoiled a good while and conveyed from one constable to another, they were glad to be rid of them in the end upon any terms; for all were wearied and tired with them. Though in the mean time they (poor souls) endured misery enough; and thus in the end necessity forced a way for them.
Page 249 - Let men of God in courts and churches watch O'er such as do a toleration hatch ; Lest that ill egg bring forth a cockatrice, To poison all with heresy and vice.
Page 296 - Virginia, do, by these presents, solemnly and mutually, in the presence of God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil body politic, for our better ordering and preservation, and furtherance of the ends aforesaid ; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute and frame such just and equal laws, ordinances, acts, constitutions, and offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the colony ; unto which we promise all due...
Page 296 - In the name of God, Amen. We whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread sovereign lord, King James, by the grace of God of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, king, defender of the faith, etc.
Page ii - District Clerk's Office. BE IT REMEMBERED, that on the tenth day of August, AD 1829, in the fifty-fourth year of the Independence of the United States of America, JP Dabney, of the said district, has deposited in this office the...
Page 148 - ... troubles broke out, the English did not possess one foot of land in this colony but what was fairly obtained by honest purchase of the Indian proprietors. Nay, because some of our people are of a covetous disposition, and the Indians are in...
Page 92 - Awashonks, with the eldest of her people, men and women mixed, kneeling down, made the first ring next the fire; and all the lusty stout men standing up made the next ; and then all the rabble, in a confused crew, surrounded on the outside. Then the chief captain stepped in between the rings and the fire, with a spear in one hand, and a hatchet in the other, danced round the. fire, and began to fight with it, making mention of all the several nations and cohipanies of Indians in the country that...

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