The Indian Races of North and South America: Comprising an Account of the Principal Aboriginal Races; a Description of Their National Customs, Mythology, and Religious Ceremonies; the History of Their Most Powerful Tribes, and of Their Most Celebrated Chiefs and Warriors; Their Intercourse and Wars with the European Settlers; and a Great Variety of Anecdote and Description, Illustrative of Personal and National Character (Google eBook)

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Hurlbut, Kellogg & Company, American Subscription Publishing House, 1860 - Indians - 720 pages
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Page 335 - I appeal to any white man to say, if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not meat; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not. During the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his cabin, an advocate for peace. Such was my love for the Whites, that my countrymen pointed as they passed, and said, ' Logan is the friend of white men.
Page 467 - Scattered were they, like flakes of snow, when the wind from the north-east Strikes aslant through the fogs that darken the Banks of Newfoundland.
Page 179 - Pocahontas, the King's dearest daughter, when no entreaty could prevail, got his head in her arms, and laid her own upon his to save him from death...
Page 335 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it : I have killed many : I have fully glutted my vengeance : for my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear. Logan never felt fear. He will not turn on his heel to save his life. Who is there to mourn for Logan ? Not one...
Page 45 - Among the high rank grass that sweeps his sides, The hollow beating of his footstep seems A sacrilegious sound. I think of those Upon whose rest he tramples. Are they here The dead of other days, and did the dust Of these fair solitudes once stir with life, And burn with passion ? Let the mighty mounds, That overlook the rivers, or that rise In the dim forest, crowded with old oaks, Answer.
Page 315 - I do not sleep; I have my eyes open; and the sun, which enlightens me, discovers to me a great captain at the head of a company of soldiers, who speaks as if he were dreaming.
Page 191 - Having reaccommodated themselves, they solemnly invited him to their lodgings, where he was no sooner within the house, but all these Nymphes more tormented him then ever, with crowding, pressing, and hanging about him, most tediously crying, Love you not me?
Page 614 - It was conducted over pathless sierras buried in snow; galleries were cut for leagues through the living rock; rivers were crossed by means of bridges that swung suspended in the air; precipices were scaled by stairways hewn out of the native bed; ravines of hideous depth were filled up with solid masonry...
Page 176 - Having feasted him after their best barbarous manner they could, a long consultation was held, but the conclusion was, two great stones were brought before Powhatan : then as many as could...
Page 206 - After a modest salutation, without any word, she turned about, obscured her face as not seeming well contented; and in that humour, her husband, with divers others, we all left her two or three hours, repenting myself to have writ she could speak English.

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