The Analects (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Dec 20, 1979 - Religion - 256 pages
12 Reviews
‘The Master said, “If a man sets his heart on benevolence, he will be free from evil”’

The Analects are a collection of Confucius’s sayings brought together by his pupils shortly after his death in 497 BC. Together they express a philosophy, or a moral code, by which Confucius, one of the most humane thinkers of all time, believed everyone should live. Upholding the ideals of wisdom, self-knowledge, courage and love of one’s fellow man, he argued that the pursuit of virtue should be every individual’s supreme goal. And, while following the Way, or the truth, might not result in immediate or material gain, Confucius showed that it could nevertheless bring its own powerful and lasting spiritual rewards.

This edition contains a detailed introduction exploring the concepts of the original work, a bibliography and glossary and appendices on Confucius himself, The Analects and the disciples who compiled them.


  

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Review: The Analects

User Review  - Mike Maxwell - Goodreads

"The beginning of wisdom is to call things by their proper names." Truer words have rarely been spoken. Confucius ranks among Socrates, Plato and Aristotle as among the most influential philosophers ... Read full review

Review: The Analects

User Review  - Benjamin Parry - Goodreads

“The gentleman devotes his efforts to the roots, for once the roots are established, the Way will grow therefrom.” It has taken me a long time to write this post. Although my aim is to write a review ... Read full review

Contents

I CONFUCIUS FORBEARS
2 BIRTH AND EARLY LIFE
4 VISIT TO CHI
5 RETURN TO LU FROM CHI
6 TRAVEL ABROAD 497484 BC
7 RETURN TO LU AND LAST YEARS
TRADITIONS IN THE Shih chi AND OTHER WORKS
THE LAST FIVE BOOKS
Textual Notes
THE KORAN
THE BHAGAVAD GITA
THE ODYSSEY HOMER
THE CONSOLATION OF PHILOSOPHY BOETHIUS
THE RUBAIYAT OF OMAR KHAYYAM
THE STORY OF PENGUIN CLASSICS
Copyright

THE FIRST FIFTEEN BOOKS

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1979)

D.C. Lau read Chinese at the University of Hong Kong, and, in 1946, he went to Glasgow, where he read philosophy. In 1950 he entered the School of Oriental and African Studies in London to teach Chinese philosophy. After lecturing in Chinese philosophy at the University of London he returned to Hong Kong, where he is a Professor at the Chinese University.
D.C. Lau read Chinese at the University of Hong Kong, and, in 1946, he went to Glasgow, where he read philosophy. In 1950 he entered the School of Oriental and African Studies in London to teach Chinese philosophy. After lecturing in Chinese philosophy at the University of London he returned to Hong Kong, where he is a Professor at the Chinese University.

D.C. Lau read Chinese at the University of Hong Kong, and, in 1946, he went to Glasgow, where he read philosophy. In 1950 he entered the School of Oriental and African Studies in London to teach Chinese philosophy. After lecturing in Chinese philosophy at the University of London he returned to Hong Kong, where he is a Professor at the Chinese University.
D.C. Lau read Chinese at the University of Hong Kong, and, in 1946, he went to Glasgow, where he read philosophy. In 1950 he entered the School of Oriental and African Studies in London to teach Chinese philosophy. After lecturing in Chinese philosophy at the University of London he returned to Hong Kong, where he is a Professor at the Chinese University.

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