The life and campaigns of general U.S. Grant, from boyhood to his inauguration as president of the United States (Google eBook)

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1869
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Page 715 - The result of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift from myself the responsibility of any further effusion of blood by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate States army known as the Army of Northern Virginia.
Page 432 - General Grant, the nation's appreciation of what you have done, and its reliance upon you for what remains to be done in the existing great struggle, are now presented, with this commission constituting you lieutenant-general in the Army of the United States. With this high honor, devolves upon you, also, a corresponding responsibility. As the country herein trusts you, so, under God, it will sustain you. I scarcely need to add, that, with what I here speak for the nation, goes my own hearty personal...
Page 716 - General, that I am equally anxious for peace with yourself; and the whole North entertain the same feeling. The terms upon which peace can be had are well understood. By the South laying down their arms they will hasten that most desirable event, save thousands of human lives, and hundreds of millions of property not yet destroyed.
Page 547 - ... GENERAL, I received at a late hour your note of to-day. In mine of yesterday I did not intend to propose the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, but to ask the terms of your proposition. To be frank, I do not think the emergency has arisen to call for the surrender of this army ; but, as the restoration of peace should be the sole object of all, I desire to know whether your proposals would tend to that end.
Page 344 - When you got below and took Port Gibson, Grand Gulf, and vicinity, I thought you should go down the river and join General Banks, and when you turned northward, east of the Big Black, I feared it was a mistake. I now wish to make the personal acknowledgment that you were right and I was wrong.
Page 440 - Not expecting to see you again before the spring campaign opens, I wish to express in this way my entire satisfaction with what you have done up to this time, so far as I understand it. The particulars of your plans I neither know nor seek to know.
Page 717 - GENERAL: I received your letter of this date containing the terms of the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia as proposed by you. As they are substantially the same as those expressed in your letter of the 8th inst., they are accepted. I will proceed to designate the proper officers to carry the stipulations into effect. RE LEE, General LIEUT.-GENERAL US GRANT.
Page 529 - I beg to present you, as a Christmas gift, the city of Savannah, with one hundred and fifty heavy guns and plenty of ammunition, and also about twenty-five thousand bales of cotton.
Page 492 - We have now ended the sixth day of very heavy fighting. The result, to this time, is much in our favor. Our losses have been heavy as well as those of the enemy. I think the loss of the enemy must be greater. 'We have taken over five thousand prisoners by battle, whilst he has taken from us but few, except stragglers. I propose to fight it out on this line, if it takes all summer.
Page 617 - You cannot qualify war in harsher terms than I wilL War is cruelty, and you cannot refine it: and those who brought war into our Country deserve all the curses and maledictions a people can pour out. I know I had no hand in making this war, and I know...

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