Deconstructing Developmental Psychology

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Psychology Press, 1994 - Psychology - 215 pages
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Erica Burman takes a fresh, critical look at developmental psychology and the gender and cultural assumptions that underpin much of the research on child development and parenting. Behaviourism, the child-centred approach, and the major theories of child language and learning, including those of Piaget and Bowlby, pathologise those individuals and groups who do not meet their idealised models. This book chellenges fundamental notions of childhood and child development.
Deconstructing Developmental Psychology is designed to accompany and comment upon conventional texts and will sharpen students' desire to examine the theories behind the facts which make up their courses. The book will appeal especially to all those who feel that developmental psychology produces an ideal which certain groups in society are unable to live up to.
  

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Contents

Origins
9
Researching infancy
23
Attributing sociality
35
Discourses of the child
48
Social development and the structure of caring
63
Bonds of love dilemmas of attachment
77
The rise of fathering
94
Language talk
107
Discourses of caregiving talk
124
Language and power in developmental research
138
The production of Piagetian psychology
151
Piaget and childcentred education
163
Morality and the goals of development
177
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About the author (1994)

Erica Burman is Senior Lecturer in Developmental and Educational Psychology at the Manchester Metropolitan University.

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