Richard Cobden: The International Man (Google eBook)

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T. F. Unwin Limited, 1919 - Great Britain - 415 pages
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Page 308 - if any violent attempt were made to overthrow the right and interfere with the independence of Denmark, those who made the attempt would find in the result that it would not be Denmark alone with which they would have to contend.
Page 353 - order to be binding, must be effective ; that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of
Page 192 - movement, for they had inexhaustible purses, which they opened freely in a contest where not only their pecuniary interests but their pride as ' an order' was at stake. But I very much doubt whether such a state of society is favourable to a democratic political movement.
Page 252 - Rare is the privilege of any man who, having fourteen years ago rendered to his country one signal and splendid service, now again within the same brief span of life, decorated neither by rank nor title, bearing no mark to distinguish him from the people whom he serves, has been permitted again to perform a great and memorable service to his country.
Page 232 - You and your friends complain of secret diplomacy, and that wars are entered into without consulting the people. Now it is in the Cabinet alone that questions of foreign policy are settled. We never consult Parliament till after they are settled. If, therefore, you wish to have a voice in these questions, you can only do so in the Cabinet.
Page 34 - their bonds and deluge whole countries with blood ; those feelings which nourish the poison of war and conquest, which assert that without conquest we can have no trade, which foster that lust for conquest and dominion which
Page 34 - is it ? Why, breaking down the barriers that separate nations ; those barriers behind which nestle the feelings of pride, revenge, hatred and jealousy, which every now and then break their bonds and deluge whole countries with blood ; those feelings which nourish the poison of war and conquest, which assert that without conquest we can have no trade, which foster that lust for conquest and dominion which
Page 270 - them. Is it not just possible that we may become corrupted at home by the reaction of arbitrary political maxims in the East upon our domestic politics, just as Greece and Rome were demoralized by their contact with Asia ? But I am wandering into the regions of the remote future. It is, however, from an abiding conviction in my mind that we have entered
Page 322 - of members of the House of Commons. And then came up from the country such a manifestation of opinion against war that day after day during that eventful week member after member from the largest constituencies went to those who acted for the Government in Parliament and told them distinctly that they would not allow war
Page 37 - We came to the conclusion that the less we attempted to persuade foreigners to adopt our trade principles, the better; for we discovered so much suspicion of the motives of England, that it was lending an argument to the protectionists abroad to incite the popular feeling against the free-traders,

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