Peter Parley's Universal history, on the basis of geography (Google eBook)

Front Cover
1869
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Contents

About the Creation The Deluge
14
Queen Semiramis sets forth to conquer the World but
22
The Bondage in Egypt Flight of the Hebrews and Destruc
29
Overthrow of the Midianites Samson Judge of Israel
36
Cm
47
Chronology of Africa
123
Introductory Remarks on its Geography and other Matters
127
About Greece Where it is situated Appearance of the Country Climate
132
The Extent of Greece First Settlement of the Country
134
The Grecian Lawgivers
137
War with Persia
139
Affairs of Athens
141
Beginning of the Theban War
144
Sequel of the Theban War
146
Grecian Religion or Mythology
149
The Grecian Philosophers
152
The Grecian Philosophers continued
154
Something more about Philosophers About the Greek Poets
157
About the Mode of Life among the ancient Greeks
160
Philip of Macedon conquers Greece
164
Conquests of Alexander the Great
167
Sequel of Alexanders Career
169
Greece invaded by the Gauls or Kelts
172
End of Grecian Independence
174
Modern History of Greece
176
Chronology of tJreece
179
Abont Italy as it now is
180
Pounding of Rome by Romulus Its Early State
183
Battle of the Horatii and Curiatii
187
From the Reign of Ancus Martins till the Expulsion of the Kings
189
The Story of Coriolanus
194
Rome invaded by the Ganls The First Punic War
195
Chap page 76 Soipios Triumph
200
Sylla and Marius
203
Cneus Pompey and Julius Caesar
205
Caesar usurps the Supreme Power
207
Assassination of Julius Caesar
209
Consequences of Caesars Death
211
About the great Power and Extent of the Roman Empire in the Time of Augustus
214
The means by which Rome acquired its Power
216
Rome under the Emperors
219
Fall of the Western Empire of the Romans
221
Progress of the Decline of Rome
224
Manners and Customs of the ancient Romans
227
About Religion Deities Temples Marriage
229
About Funeral Rites and Ceremonies
232
Roman Farms Mode of Ploughing Farmhouses Grain Cattle Superstitions of the Farmers Gardens Vines
236
Country Houses Description of Plinys Villa Aqueducts
243
About Naval Affairs The War Galley Commerce Shows of Wild Beasts Exhibitions of Gladiators
246
Sports Chariot Racing The Circus Carriages Private Entertainments Supper Rooms Convivial Parties Luxuries
249
About Theatres Clocks and Watches The Fine Arts Books and Writing Costume Conclusion
252
Rome under the Popes 255
259
Chronology of Rome
261
Sequel of the Turkish History
269
Early History of Spain The Moorish Conquest
272
Wars between the Moors and Spaniards
278
The Invincible Armada Curious death of a Spanish King Recent Affairs of Spain
280
A short Story about Portugal
283
Chronology of Turkey Spain and Portugal
285
Description of France Its Climate Cities Manufactures Manners and Customs of the People
287
About the Gauls and other Tribes of Barbarians How the Southern Parts of Europe were first settled and how the Northern Parts were settled afterwards
290
Story of the Barbarians continued
292
The Gauls Origin of the French Nation
295
About Clovis and Little King Pepin
297
The Reign of Charlemagne
299
About the Crusades or Holy Wars
302
About the Feudal System
305
About Chivalry or KnightErrantry
310
More about Chivalry 813
313
History of Prussia
353
Chronology of Germany Austria Hungary and Prussia
358
Description of Russia
360
The Reign of Peter the Great
365
The Successors of Peter the Great
367
About Sweden
368
Charles the Twelfth and his Successors
373
About Lapland Norway and Denmark
375
Brief Notices of several Kingdoms and States 878
380
Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland
382
About London and other cities of England Wales Scot land and Ireland
386
Origin of the British Nation The Druids
388
Saxon and Danish Kings of England
391
Norman Kings of England
393
English wars and Rebellions
396
The Lancastrian Kings of England 899
399
Wars of the Roses
402
Reigns of the Tudor Princes
404
The Reign of Elizabeth
407
Accession of the House of Stuart
410
Wars of the King and Parliament
412
The Protectorate and the Restoration
416
The Revolution of 1688 and other Matters
418
The Hanoverian Kings of Great Britain
421
The Story of Wales
424
The Story of Scotland
427
fi_ In Asia About the Climate People and other things 263 _i1 ik
431
Matters and Things
434
Chronology of Great Britain
437
Review The Dark Ages Important Inventions a
439
General Chronology of Europe
445
AMERICA
447
Abont America
448
The first Inhabitants of America
452
Discovery of America by Columbus
454
A few words about Iceland and Greenland Settlements of the French in America
459
The French Colonies conquered by the English
461
Description of the United States
463
Settlement and Colonial History of New England
465
Affairs of New England continued
467
Early History of Virginia
470
Settlement of the other Colonies
472
Causes which led to the Revolution
473
The American War
475
Affairs of the United States since the Revolution
477
General Remarks upon the History of the United States
480
About South America El Dorado and the Fountain of Youth
482
History of the Mexican Territories Guatimala
484
Spanish Peruvian Territories
487
Account of the Brazilian Territories
489
The West Indies
491
The West Indies continued
497
Chronology of America
500
OCEANIA
502
About Oceania The Malaysian Islands
503
The Australian Divisions of Oceania
504
Polynesia The Sandwich Islands
510
Story of the Bounty concluded
512
Chronology of Oceania
515
Duration of Empires continued Europe
520
Ancient Names of Countries c
527
The Origin and Progress of Government
530
Architecture Agriculture Gardening
533
Commerce
538
Painting Sculpture and Music
544
Origin and Progress of various Arts
549
Dates of Discoveries and Inventions
553
Reigning Monarch
558

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 67 - Zone, between 4° 4' and 20° 3' north latitude and 116° 4' and 126° 34' east longitude from the meridian of Greenwich. It is surrounded on the north and west by the China Sea, on the east by the Pacific Ocean, and on the south by the Sea of Celebes.
Page 257 - I. of Savoy. King Carlo Alberto the first of the house of Savoy-Carignano, abdicated the throne March 23, 1849, in favour of his son, the present king.
Page 218 - At last, he fell into a swoon, and his guards smothered him with his bed-clothes. 5. His successor was Caligula, who wished that the whole Roman people had but one head, that he might chop it off at a single blow. He also was murdered by his guards, and was succeeded by Claudius, an idiot. Claudius was poisoned by his own wife. 6. Nero was the next emperor. His whole reign was a scene of bloodshed. He murdered his mother and his wife. He set Rome on fire, merely for the pleasure of seeing it blaze.
Page 99 - Africa may be considered as, on the whole, the least civilized portion of the earth. The people are mostly Mahometans, and one half of them are nearly in a savage state. The rest are in a barbarous condition. 8. The central parts of Africa abound in wild animals, such as lions, panthers, leopards, elephants, rhinoceroses, zebras, and quaggas. The woods are filled with chattering monkeys, the thickets are infested with monstrous serpents, ostriches roam over the deserts, various kinds of antelopes...
Page 465 - I have said, contains the stales of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut. It is bounded north by Lower Canada, east by New Brunswick and the Atlantic Ocean, south by the Atlantic and Long Island Sound, and west by New York. 3. In the year 1620, a ship called the Mayflower arrived on the coast of New England, with a number of ministers, and pious men and women, and their children. They...
Page 542 - The most remarkable precious stones are the diamond which is colorless and transparent, the sapphire blue, the topaz yellow, the amethyst purple, and the garnet a deep red. The first nations who paid attention to architecture were the Babylonians who built the Temple of Belus and the hanging gardens, the Assyrians who filled Nineveh with splendid buildings, the Phoenicians whose cities were adorned with magnificent structures, and the Israelites whose temple was considered wonderful.
Page 98 - Europeans • for the greater part of the inhabitants are negroes, of which there are many tribes. Some of these are intelligent, and live tolerably well, but the greater part are either in a savage or a barbarous state. 4. The climate being warm they need little shelter or clothing. Their houses are therefore poor huts, or slight tenements made of leaves or branches of trees.
Page 506 - Europe— with a seaboard of 2,250 miles. The colony formed, under the name of Moreton Bay, a part of New South Wales until it was erected into a separate colony, with the name of Queensland, by an order of Her Majesty in Council, which took effect on December 10, 1859, upon the arrival of the first governor.
Page 325 - EUROPE continued, THE FRENCH REVOLUTION . 1. Louis the Sixteenth had no talents which could render him fit to govern a nation. But he was a man of good heart, kind disposition, and upright intentions. "With all his defects, there has seldom been a better king ; for, if he was unable to do good, he was unwilling to do harm. 2. The king was married to an Austrian archduchess, named Marie Antoinette. She had great beauty and accomplishments ; but she was never a favourite of the French people. 3. Not...
Page 408 - England. But a storm destroyed part of the ships, and the English fleet conquered the remainder. 5. Some of the actions of Queen Elizabeth were almost as bad as those of old Harry, her father. When Mary, the beautiful queen of Scots, fled into England for protection, she caused her to be imprisoned eighteen years. And, after those long and weary years, the poor queen was tried, and condemned to die. 6. Elizabeth was resolved upon her death, but she was loath to incur the odium of such a crime.

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