The Law's Beginnings

Front Cover
Ferdinand Joseph Maria Feldbrugge
Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Jan 1, 2003 - Law - 289 pages
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Law, as we know it, with its rules and rituals, its procedures and professionals, has not been around forever. It came into being, it emerged, at different places and different times. Sources which allow us to observe the processes of law's beginnings have survived in some cases. In this book, scholars from various disciplines-linguists, lawyers, historians, anthropologists-present their findings concerning the earliest legal systems of a great variety of peoples and civilizations, from Mesopotamia and Ancient India to Greece and Rome, from the early Germanic, Celtic and Slavic nations, but also from other parts of the world. The general picture is complemented by an investigation into the Indo-European roots of a number of ancient legal systems, contributions from the point of view of legal philosophy and theory, and an overview of the insights gained.
  

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Contents

INCIPIENT LAW ASPECTS OF LEGAL PHILOSOPHY
1
JUSTICE AND WRITTEN LAWS IN THE FORMATION OF THE POLIS 2343
23
Auctoritas futons 4558
45
AN EMERGING LEGAL SYSTEM IN AN EMBRYONIC STATE
59
THE Lex Frisionum THE GENESIS OF A LEGALIZED LIFE 7792
77
THE EARLIEST LAW OF RUSSIA AND ITS SOURCES 93113
93
GLIMPSES OF INDOEUROPEAN LAW 115136
115
BEFORE HAMMURABI OF BABYLON
137
ASPECTS OF LAW AND ORDER IN EARLY STATE SOCIETIES 161179
161
A NEW BEGINNING OF LAW AMONG INDIGENOUS PEOPLES
181
LAWS BEGINNING 221253
221
LAWS BEGINNINGS SOME CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS 255280
255
F Feldbrugge
271
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