Neighborhood and Ancestry: Variation in the Spoken Arabic of Maiduguri, Nigeria

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John Benjamins Publishing, Jan 1, 1998 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 396 pages
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Over the past 35 years urban sociolinguistics has developed upon the base of detailed case studies carried out mainly in western countries. A fundamental dichotomy informing the interpretation of variation has been carried out within what is termed the standard-vernacular model . Higher vs. lower social class, power vs. solidarity, open networks vs. closed networks are a few of the conceptual dyads which have been invoked to order linguistic variation operating with an input from a standard/vernacular source. The present study, based on the spoken Arabic of Maiduguri, Nigeria, focuses on a linguistic landscape where the notions of standard and vernacular are of little relevance in ordering urban linguistic variants. It is argued that linguistic variation is best conceptualized and ordered in terms of the twin variables of neighborhood and ancestral norms. A detailed analysis of 13 linguistic variables based on a corpus of about 500,000 words invokes an urban linguistic world different from that in the West. To integrate this landscape into current sociolinguistic thinking a typology of urban variation is outlined using familar, yet relatively unutilized sociolinguistic parameters: neighborhood, ancestry, minority status and institutionalization.
  

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Contents

CHAPTER 1 Introduction
1
CHAPTER 2 The Peculiar Unity of Nigerian Arabic
23
CHAPTER 3 The Linguistic Variables
39
CHAPTER 4 The Comparative Dialectology of the 13 Linguistic Variables
71
CHAPTER 5 Rural Nigerian Arabic
86
CHAPTER 6 Maiduguri and the Basic Sample
115
towards a characterization of neoancestral norms
167
CHAPTER 8 NonCorpus Data
199
CHAPTER 11 Setting and Linguistic Variation
247
CHAPTER 12 Three Micro Studies
258
CHAPTER 13 Expanding the Typology of Urban LinguisticVariation
295
Arabic Texts
301
Appendix II
377
Bibliography
382
Index of Subjects
390
Index of Names
394

CHAPTER 9 Variation and Language Attitudes
205
CHAPTER 10 Linguistic Variation and SocioPolitics
231

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