The Contested Castle: Gothic Novels and the Subversion of Domestic Ideology

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University of Illinois Press, Jan 1, 1989 - Literary Criticism - 226 pages
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The Gothic novel emerged out of the romantic mist alongside a new conception of the home as a separate sphere for women. Looking at novels from Horace Walpole's Castle of Otranto to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Kate Ferguson Ellis investigates the relationship between these two phenomena of middle-class culture - the idealization of the home and the popularity of the Gothic - and explores how both male and female authors used the Gothic novel to challenge the false claim of home as a safe, protected place. Linking terror - the most important ingredient of the Gothic novel - to acts of transgression, Ellis shows how houses in Gothic fiction imprison those inside them, while those locked outside wander the earth plotting their return and their revenge.
  

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Contents

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
vii
INTRODUCTION
ix
The Language of Domestic Violence
3
Guarding the Gates to the Female Mind
20
Miltons Progeny
33
Otranto Feminized Horace Walpole Clara Reeve Sophia Lee
57
Radical Terror Charlotte Smith Mary Wollstonecraft
76
Kidnapped Romance in Ann Radciffe
99
The Outsiders Revenge Matthew Gregory Lewis
131
Men as They Are William Godwin
151
The Self under Siege Charles Robert Maturin
166
Mary Shelleys Embattled Garden
181
Emily Bronte and the Technology of Self
207
INDEX
223
Copyright

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About the author (1989)

Kate Ferguson Ellis is an associate professor of English at Rutgers University.

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