Belgium and Western Germany in 1833: Including Visits to Baden-Baden, Wiesbaden, Cassel, Hanover, the Harz Mountains ... (Google eBook)

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Hauman, 1835 - Belgium
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Page 116 - For it so falls out, That what we have we prize not to the worth, Whiles we enjoy it; but being lack'd and lost, Why, then we rack the value; then we find The virtue, that possession would not show us Whiles it was ours...
Page 159 - Round others, the dust lies where it had fallen, as dropped, grain by grain, from the mouldering cheeks; and the head grins from beneath the cowl nearly in the state of a skeleton. The garments are almost in the same unequal degree of preservation ; for in many the white material is still firm, though discoloured, while in others it is dropping away in fragments. The shoes of all are wonderfully perfect. * The last person buried in this vault was one who acted as gardener to the community. His head...
Page 158 - ... the proper degree of preparatory expectation, while he detained them waiting ' near the high altar, near which was the large trap-door that opened on the vault.' At length he arrived, key in hand: ' I hardly know what we had expected from this sepulchral examination, but it certainly must have been something very different from the reality, for we were jesting and laughing when the man arrived ; and even when we saw the two lads, who accompanied him, raise the massy door, I believe not one...
Page 83 - Hollandaise, blesse le 18 Juin, 1815, a la memorable bataille de Waterloo ; qui par son heroisme a concouni au triomphe de la cause du genre humain ; Glorieusement decidee par 1'eclatante victoire du dit jour.
Page 42 - ... changed for an ample veil of rich black silk, that completely envelopes the head and shoulders. In both dresses the face is concealed in a considerable degree ; and when in the act of devotion, no part of the countenance is permitted to be visible. The long black rows of veiled heads which we constantly saw in the churches often made me fancy myself surrounded by nuns. Nor is it in the dress alone that the Flemish citizens show traces of their Spanish ancestors ; we remarked many beautiful women,...
Page 41 - The circumstance that most forcibly struck me, on my first walk through Antwerp, was the Spanish air of the women. We had remarked something of this both at Bruges and Ghent, but by no means in so great a degree. At Antwerp the mantilla is universal among the women ; the higher classes, indeed, there, as everywhere else, are as nearly Parisian in appearance as they can contrive to be'; but many among the wealthy bourgeoisie wear this graceful drapery of costly materials, and arranged with great care...
Page 5 - Her withered arms were extended, and an air of the most passionate adoration animated her sunken features as she gazed on this frightful idol. And after all, perhaps, there is something sublime in the state of mind which allows not the senses to dwell on the object before them, but, occupied alone by the holiness of the symbol, is raised by it to such thoughts of heaven as chase all feelings but those of devotion. That this is often the case with sincere Roman Catholics, I have no doubt ; and it...
Page 192 - The river nobly foams and flows, The charm of this enchanted ground, And all its thousand turns disclose Some fresher beauty varying round : The haughtiest breast its wish might bound Through life to dwell delighted here ; Nor could on earth a spot be found To nature and to me so dear, Could thy dear eyes in following mine Still sweeten more these banks of Rhine ! LVI. By Coblentz, on a rise of gentle ground, There is a small and simple pyramid, Crowning the summit of the verdant mound ; Beneath...
Page 158 - They are so placed as to be exposed to the closest examination, both of touch and sight ; and the remembrance of my walk through them still makes me shudder. The wonderful state of preservation in which these bodies remain, though constantly exposed to the atmosphere by being thus exhibited, is attributed, by good Catholics, to the peculiar sanctity of the place ; but to those who do not receive this solution of the mystery, it is one of great difficulty. The dates of their interment vary from 1400...
Page 160 - The shoes of all are wonderfully perfect. ' The last person buried in this vault was one who acted as gardener to the community. His head is crowned with a wreath of flowers, which still preserves its general form ; nay, the larger blossoms may yet be distinguished from the smaller ones, but with withered leaves lie mixed with his fallen hair on either side. ' Altogether the scene is well calculated to produce a cold shiver in the beholder, and yet we all lingered over it. There is certainly some...

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