History of England from the Restoration to the Revolution (Google eBook)

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1875
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Page 23 - That the lords and commons are of opinion, that there hath been, and still is, a damnable and hellish plot, contrived and carried on by the Popish recusants, for assassinating the king, for subverting the government, and for rooting out and destroying the Protestant religion.".
Page 132 - The king there promised, that he would maintain his loving subjects in all their properties and possessions, as well of church and abbey lands as of any other.
Page 54 - That on complaint and request in writing by or on behalf of any person committed and charged with any crime, (unless committed for treason or felony expressed in the warrant; or as accessory, or on suspicion of being accessory, before the fact, to any...
Page 112 - Yes, sir, his own hand," was the answer. James read the petition : he folded it up ; and his countenance grew dark. "This," he said, "is a great surprise to me. I did not expect this from your Church, especially from some of you. This is a standard of rebellion.
Page 80 - This pillar was set up in perpetual remembrance of the most dreadful burning of this Protestant city, begun and carried on by the treachery and malice of the Popish faction, in the beginning of September, in the year of our LORD 1666, in order to the carrying on their horrid plot for extirpating the Protestant Religion, and old English Liberty, and introducing Popery and Slavery.
Page 136 - I can never forget the inexpressible luxury and profaneness, gaming and all dissoluteness, and as it were total forgetfulness of God (it being Sunday evening) which this day se'nnight I was witness of, the King sitting and toying with his concubines, Portsmouth, Cleveland...
Page 161 - That John Bunyan of the town of Bedford, labourer, being a person of such and such conditions, he hath (since such a time) devilishly and perniciously abstained from coming to church to hear divine service, and is a common upholder of several unlawful meetings and conventicles, to the great disturbance and distraction of the good subjects of this kingdom, contrary to the laws of our sovereign lord the king, &c.
Page 70 - And there shall none be admitted to the Holy Communion, until such time as he be confirmed, or be ready and desirous to be confirmed.
Page 141 - The London Gazette came out only on Mondays and Thursdays. The contents generally were a royal proclamation, two or three Tory addresses, notices of two or three promotions, an account of a skirmish between the imperial troops and the Janissaries on the Danube, a description of a highwayman, an announcement of a grand cockfight between two persons of honour, and an advertisement offering a reward for a strayed dog. The whole made up two pages of moderate size.
Page 7 - ... and those who never did a foolish thing, and never said a wise one, would not you rather that I should belong to the latter class ? " " Certainly, if I were reduced to the cruel alternative : but is there an unavoidable necessity for your belonging to either class ? " " I will consider of it, ma'am...

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