The Beauties of All Magazines Selected for ..., Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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T. Waller, 1764
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Page 393 - Then give place to the physician, for the Lord hath created him: Let him not go from thee, for thou hast need of him . There is a time when in their hands there is good success.
Page 193 - Come hither, all ye empty things, Ye bubbles rais'd by breath of Kings; Who float upon the tide of state, Come hither, and behold your fate. Let pride be taught by this rebuke, How very mean a thing's a Duke; From all his ill-got honours flung, Turn'd to that dirt from whence he sprung.
Page 350 - ... adding virtue to virtue, and knowledge to knowledge ; carries in it something wonderfully agreeable to that ambition which is natural to the mind of man. Nay, it must be a prospect pleasing to God himself, to see his creation for ever beautifying in his eyes, and drawing nearer to him, by greater degrees of resemblance.
Page 206 - And it came to pass after these things, that Abraham sat in the door of his tent, about the going down of the sun. 2. And behold a man, bowed with age, came from the way of the wilderness, leaning on a staff.
Page 179 - Indian habit, refined, naturalized, and put into the British mode, with the face of Queen Elizabeth on one side, and the arms of the country on the other. Being thus equipped, I found in me a wonderful inclination to ramble, and visit all...
Page 340 - Britannic Majesty shall cause to be demolished all the fortifications which His subjects shall have erected in the Bay of Honduras, and other places of the Territory of Spain in that part of the world...
Page 180 - ... my officer, chancing one morning to walk abroad earlier than ordinary, sacrificed me to his pleasures, and made use of me to seduce a milk-maid. This wench bent me, and gave me to her sweetheart, applying more properly than she intended the usual form of, 'To my love and from my love.
Page 206 - And when Abraham saw that the man blessed not God, he said unto him, Wherefore dost thou not worship the most high God, creator of heaven and earth?
Page 181 - The first was, my being in a poet's pocket, who was so taken with the brightness and novelty of my appearance, that it gave occasion to the finest burlesque poem in the British language, entitled from me,
Page 228 - Cudjoe stopped them at the door, and demanded what they wanted. " The white men," said they, " have carried away our brothers and sons, and we will kill all white men. Give us the white man you have in your house, for we will kill him.

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