Indo-European Linguistics: An Introduction (Google eBook)

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Cambridge University Press, Oct 18, 2007 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 260 pages
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The Indo-European language family consists of many of the modern and ancient languages of Europe, India and Central Asia, including Latin, Greek, Sanskrit, Russian, German, French, Spanish and English. Spoken by an estimated three billion people, it has the largest number of native speakers in the world today. This textbook provides an accessible introduction to the study of the Indo-European languages. It clearly sets out the methods for relating the languages to one another, presents an engaging discussion of the current debates and controversies concerning their classification, and offers sample problems and suggestions for how to solve them. Complete with a comprehensive glossary, almost 100 tables in which language data and examples are clearly laid out, suggestions for further reading, discussion points, and a range of exercises, this text will be an essential toolkit for all those studying historical linguistics, language typology and the Indo-European languages for the first time.
  

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Contents

1 The IndoEuropean language family
1
2 Phonology
27
Tocharian
37
Tocharian
38
Tocharian
39
Table 26 Frequency of reconstructed phonemes in PIE roots in
41
Old Church Old
50
3 Morphophonology
64
Sanskrit Greek Latin
96
5 Verbal morphology
114
6 Syntax
157
7 Lexicon and lexical semantics
187
Baltic Tocharian Albanian
193
relations by blood
202
mothers
203
relations by marriage
204

4 Nominal morphology
90
peku moveable property
208

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Page 2 - The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either; yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs, and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong, indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists.

About the author (2007)

James Clackson is senior lecturer in the Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge, and is Fellow and Director of Studies, Jesus College, University of Cambridge.

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