Sketches of the ecclesiastical history of the state of Maine: from the earliest settlement to the present time (Google eBook)

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H. Gray, 1821 - Maine - 370 pages
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Page 48 - London to ordain only one, but could not prevail: 2, If they consented, we know the slowness of their proceedings ; but the matter admits of no delay : 3. If they would ordain them now, they would likewise expect to govern them. And how grievously would this entangle us ? 4.
Page 48 - But the case is widely different between England and North America. Here there are bishops who have a legal jurisdiction. In America there are none, neither any parish ministers.
Page 57 - Essex ss. The Jurors for our sovereign Lord and Lady the King and Queen, present, that George Burroughs, late of Falmouth in the Province of Massachusetts bay, clerk, the ninth day of May, in the fourth year of the reign of our sovereign Lord and Lady William and Mary, by the grace of God of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, King and Queen, defenders of the faith, &c.
Page 48 - If any one will point out a more rational and scriptural way of feeding and guiding those poor sheep in the wilderness, I will gladly embrace it. At present I cannot see any better method than that I have taken.
Page 49 - They are now at full liberty simply to follow the Scriptures and the primitive church. And we judge it best that they should stand fast in that liberty wherewith God has so strangely made them free.
Page 156 - For there is not a just man upon earth, who doeth good and sinneth not.
Page 59 - about 7 or 8 years before that time he lived at Casco Bay. George Burroughs was then minister there, that having seen much of his great strength, and the said Burroughs coming to our house, we were in discourse about the same, and he then told me, he had put his fingers into a bung hole of a barrel of molasses, and lifted it up, and carried it round him and set it down again.
Page 47 - Assemblies. But no one either exercises or claims any ecclesiastical authority at all. In this peculiar situation some thousands of the inhabitants of these States, desire my advice, and in compliance with their desire, I have drawn up a little sketch.
Page 48 - I have accordingly appointed Dr. Coke and Mr. Francis Asbury to be joint superintendents over our brethren in North America, as also Richard Whatcoat and Thomas Vasey to act as elders among them, by baptizing and administering the Lord's supper.
Page 47 - BY a very uncommon train of providences, many of the provinces of North America are totally disjoined from the mother country, and erected into independent states. The English government has no authority over them, either civil or ecclesiastical, any more than over the states of Holland. A civil authority is exercised over them, partly by the congress, partly by the provincial assemblies. But no one either...

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