Urban Problems and Community Development (Google eBook)

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Ronald F. Ferguson, William T. Dickens
Brookings Institution Press, Jan 1, 2011 - Social Science - 628 pages
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In recent years, concerned governments, businesses, and civic groups have launched ambitious programs of community development designed to halt, and even reverse, decades of urban decline. But while massive amounts of effort and money are being dedicated to improving the inner-cities, two important questions have gone unanswered: Can community development actually help solve long-standing urban problems? And, based on social science analyses, what kinds of initiatives can make a difference? This book surveys what we currently know and what we need to know about community development's past, current, and potential contributions. The authors--economists, sociologists, political scientists, and a historian--define community development broadly to include all capacity building (including social, intellectual, physical, financial, and political assets) aimed at improving the quality of life in low- to moderate-income neighborhoods. The book addresses the history of urban development strategies, the politics of resource allocation, business and workforce development, housing, community development corporations, informal social organizations, schooling, and public security.
  

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Contents

I
1
II
33
III
77
IV
139
V
193
VI
241
VII
293
VIII
339
IX
381
X
437
XI
473
XII
521
XIII
569
XIV
611
Copyright

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Tackling Social Exclusion
John Pierson
No preview available - 2002
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About the author (2011)

William T. Dickens, a senior fellow in the Economics Studies program at the Brookings Institution, was previously a senior economist on the President's Council of Economic Advisers and professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley. Ronald F. Ferguson has taught at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government since 1983 and is senior research associate at Harvard's Wiener Center for Social Policy.

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