A New Voyage Round the World in the Years 1823, 24, 25, and 26 (Google eBook)

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H. Colburn & R. Bentley, 1830 - Discoveries in geography
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Page 22 - ... of St. Peter and St. Paul. One of them finding the outer gate of a house open, entered, and the gate accidentally closed after him. The woman of the house had just placed a large tea-machine,* full of boiling water, in the court, the bear smelt to- it and burned his nose ; provoked at the pain, he vented all his fury upon the kettle, folded his fore-paws round it, pressed it with his whole strength against his breast to crush it, and burnt himself, of course, still more and more.
Page 112 - It has hitherto been the fate of these regions," writes Kotzebue, "like that of modest merit or humble virtue, to remain unnoticed; but posterity will do them justice; towns and cities will hereafter flourish where all is now desert; the waters, over which scarcely a solitary boat is yet seen to glide, will reflect the flags of all nations; and a happy prosperous people receiving with thankfulness what prodigal nature bestows for their use, will disperse her treasures over every part of the world.
Page 95 - These dungeons are opened two or three times a day, but only to allow the prisoners to pass to and from the church. I have occasionally seen the poor girls rushing out eagerly to breathe the fresh air, and driven immediately into the church like a flock of sheep, by an old ragged Spaniard armed with a stick.
Page 135 - One of our thickest cables broke, and if the second had given way, we should have been driven on the rocky shore of the channel which unites the bay with the sea, where a powerful current, struggling with the tempest, produced a frightful surf. Fortunately the extreme violence of the storm lasted only a few hours, but in that short time it caused a destructive inundation ; the water spread so rapidly over the low lands that our people had scarcely time to secure the tent, with the astronomical apparatus.
Page 126 - They appear indeed by no means stupid, and are much more cheerful and contented than at the missions, where a deep melancholy always clouds their faces, and their eyes are constantly fixed upon the ground; but this difference is only the natural result of the different treatment they experience. They have no permanent residence, but wander about naked, and, when not employed by the Russians as day laborers, follow no occupation but the chase. For the winter they lay up a provision of acorns and wild...
Page 111 - ... could not help speculating upon the benefit this country would derive from becoming a province of our powerful empire, and how useful it would prove to Russia. An inexhaustible granary for Kamtschatka, Ochotsk, and all the settlements of the American Company; these regions, so often afflicted with a scarcity of corn, would derive new life from a close connection with California. The sun rose in full magnificence from behind the mountain, at the moment when, emerging from between the islands which...
Page 126 - Ross is blest with an abundance of the finest wood for building. The sea provides it with the most delicious fish, the land with an inexhaustible quantity of the best kinds of game; and, notwithstanding the want of a good harbor, the northern settlements might easily find in this a plentiful...
Page 123 - ... The dragoons who accompanied us had brought a number of old gunlocks to be repaired. "In order that the Russians might not extend their dominion to the northern shore of the Bay of St. Francisco, the Spaniards immediately founded the missions of St. Gabriel (Rafael) and St. Francisco Salano (Sonoma). It is a great pity that we were not beforehand with them. The advantages of possessing this beautiful bay are incalculable, especially as we have no harbor but the bad one of Bodega or Port Romanzow.
Page 22 - One of them, finding the outer gate of a house open, entered, and the gate accidentally closed after him. The woman of the house had just placed a large tea-machine, full of boiling water, in the court ; the bear smelt to it, and burned his nose : provoked at the pain, he vented all his fury upon the kettle, folded his fore-paws round it, pressed it with his whole strength against his breast to crush it, and burned himself, of course, still more and more. The horrible growl which rage and pain forced...
Page 207 - Two young girls lightly dressed, sat cross-legged by the side of the queen, flapping away the flies with bunches of feathers. Nomahanna, who appeared at the utmost not more than forty years old, was exactly six feet two inches high and rather more than two ells in circumference. She wore an old-fashioned European dress of blue silk; her coal-black hair was neatly plaited at the top of a head as round as a ball; her flat nose and thick projecting lips were certainly not very handsome, yet was her...

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