Queen Hortense: a life picture of the Napoleonic era (Google eBook)

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A. L. Fowle, 1870 - 383 pages
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Page 205 - I could sully my honor for any, even the highest, reward. Neither the prospect of possessing the crown of the duchy of Genoa, nor that of the kingdom of Italy, can induce me to become a traitor. The example of the King of Naples cannot mislead me; I will rather be a plain soldier than a traitorous prince.
Page 129 - Josephine," said he, his voice trembling with emotion, " my good Josephine, you know that I have loved you ! To you, and to you alone, do I owe the only moments of happiness I have enjoyed in this world. Josephine, my destiny is stronger than my will. My dearest desires must yield to the interests of France." * "Speak no further," cried Josephine, withdrawing her hand angrily — " no, speak no further. I understand you, and I expected this, but the blow is not the less deadly.
Page 238 - Yes — no,' said the queen, visibly confused, ' I shall read it again,' and, in order to conceal an emotion that I alone could understand, she abruptly changed the topic of conversation. « " She might have said the truth, and simply informed them that the book had appeared just at the time her eldest son had died in Holland. The king, disquieted at seeing her so profoundly given up to her grief, believed, in accordance with Corvisart's advice, that it was necessary to arouse her from this state...
Page 211 - the Faubourg St. Germain regards your majesty's zeal in the queen's behalf with great jealousy. It has even caused Count Nesselrode much concern. ' Our emperor,' said he to me, recently, ' goes to Malmaison much too often ; the high circles of society, and the diplomatic body, are already in dismay about it ; it is feared that he is there subjected to influences to which policy requires he should not be exposed.
Page 225 - ... to France, as a simple act of justice ; she even went so far in her generosity as to extend the hospitalities of her drawing-rooms to the poetess's son, who was avoided and fled from by every one else. Hortense's soft entreaties and representations were at last successful in soothing the emperor's anger. He allowed Madame de Stae'l to return to France, on the condition that she should never come to Paris or its vicinity ; he then also accorded Madame de Stael's son the longsought favor of an...
Page 147 - He seldom quitted it, either by day or night; and here, like Haroun-al-Raschid, he took part in the harmless merriment of happy and contented poverty. And here this poor man was to find a last delight, a last consolation; here he was to find a last friend. This last friend of the Duke d'Abrantes — this Pylades of the poor Orestes — was — a madman! — a poor simpleton, of good family, who was so good-humored and harmless that he was allowed to go at large, and free scope given to his innocent...
Page 17 - I would not call her so if she were unworthy," and when he saw his handsome son, Eugene, gazing at him wistfully, his head resting on his mother's shoulder, his heart relented. Leading little Hortense by the hand, he stepped forward to his wife, and, with a loud cry of joy and a blissful greeting of love, Josephine sank on his bosom. Peace was re-established, and husband and wife were now united in a closer bond of love than ever before. The storms seemed to have spent their rage, and the heaven...
Page 191 - The queen called him back, and demanded with earnest severity to know what he had done. The little prince returned reluctantly, hanging his head with embarrassment, and said, blushing deeply : " Ah, maman, it is the ring Uncle Eugene gave me. I wished to give it to the emperor, because he is so good to my ma/man, ! " Deeply touched, the emperor took the boy in his arms, seated him on his knees, and kissed him tenderly. Then, in order to give the little prince an immediate reward, he attached the...
Page 229 - Ah, bah! sacred! Are not all the debts of the state sacred ?" " Without doubt, sire; but ours is accompanied by peculiar circumstances." rising to terminate the long interview, that began to weary him. " What creditor of the state does not say the same of his debt ? Moreover, I know too little of your relations toward my government . This matter does not...
Page 265 - Despre's shall reply to this article at once," said Hortense. " Although paternal love on the one side, and maternal love on the other, has involved us in a painful process, it nevertheless concerns uo one else, and it disgraces neither of us. I should be in despair, if this sad controversy were made the pretext for insulting the father of my children and the honored name he bears. For the very reason that I stand alone, am I called on to defend the absent to the best of my ability. Therefore let...

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