A History of Ancient Geography Among the Greeks and Romans from the Earliest Ages Till the Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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John Murray, 1883 - Geography, Ancient
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Page 322 - ... N. lat. 7° 45'), and startling as it may at first appear that the voyagers should have penetrated so far to the south, the arguments in favour of this view may be regarded as almost, if not quite, conclusive. It has been adopted both by the most recent editor of the Periplus of Hanno (C. Muller), and by M. de St. Martin in his elaborate and valuable work on the ancient geography of Africa. Both of these writers have supplied important corrections and additions, arising in part from our improved...
Page 517 - ... already been washed away by the stream. This is one of many proofs of the great changes that have taken place in the course of the Nile within a few years, and fully accounts for certain towns, now on the river, being laid down by ancient geographers in an inland position. At Girgeh there is a Latin convent or monastery, the superior of which is an European.
Page 190 - No trace is 99). miles.5 It is evident that this idea of the conformation of the country is so widely different from its real position and figure, that it would be a mere waste of time to attempt to discuss it in minute detail, or attempt to reconcile it with the natural boundaries. The important result is, that he considered the country inhabited by the Scythians (properly so called) to extend only about 400 G. miles inland, whether measured from the Euxine or the Palus...
Page 520 - ... This line of route has been followed in very recent times by Major Ross from Kedj to Bela, and seems to form a natural line of communication, keeping throughout about the required distance (60 or 70 miles) from the coast [the distance required for maintaining communication with the fleet]. . . . This line of march so far as is yet known does not appear to traverse any such frightful deserts of sand as those described by the historians of Alexander. Nor can the site of Pura ... be determined with...
Page 477 - ... occidentales scribunt. In hoc enim casu non habuerunt experientiam certam per se nee per alios, sed ex rumore scripserunt. In libris autem de moribus Tartarorum, ut per fide dignos qui in illis regionibus fuerunt patet. quod hoc mare fit ex concursu fluminum, et est mare satis magnum. 1 This pass is ' still traversed by the most frequented route from Teheran to Meshed and Herat. The identity of this pass with the one now known as the Sirdar pass, between Veramin and Kishlak in Khowar, has been...
Page 441 - ... regions, we should still, in all probability, find ourselves wholly unable to trace his marches, or identify with any certainty the mountain strongholds that he reduced. The account of these campaigns that has been preserved to us is utterly vague and meagre. The historians that have transmitted it to us had assuredly no clear geographical conception in their own minds of the country in which they took place: and the same may be asserted with almost equal confidence of the writers whom they followed....
Page 120 - Egypt, to have fixed the year at three hundred and sixty-five days, to have determined the course of the sun from solstice to solstice, and to have calculated eclipses. He attributed an eclipse of the moon to the interposition of the earth between the sun and moon, and an eclipse of the sun to the interposition of the moon between the sun and earth,—and thus taught the rotundity of the earth, sun, and moon.
Page 448 - ... kingly government to republican independence, and allowed the Brahman to exercise a decisive influence over public life. The descent of the Indus by Alexander, as Bunbury remarks, may be considered as constituting a kind of aera in the geographical knowledge of the Greeks. It does not appear, he adds, that it was ever repeated ; and while subsequent researches added materially to the knowledge possessed by the Greeks of the valley of the Ganges and the more easterly provinces of India, their...
Page 531 - The inhabitants still live entirely on fish, the cattle having much the same diet as their masters, for the country is wholly destitute and barren, and yields no sort of grass. Vast stores of oysters, crabs, and all kinds of shell-fish are found on the coast, of which Nearohus'a description is generally very accurate.
Page 9 - Egyptians had long been familiar, and of whom the knowledge probably passed from them through the Phoenicians to the Greeks. Through the Egyptians also must have come the fable of a race of Pygmies, situated apparently in the South of Africa, on the Ocean stream, and engaged in constant wars with the cranes that visited their country as immigrants from the North.1 § 5. It does not fall within the scope of the present work to enter into a detailed examination of the Phoenician commerce, even if there...

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