Acquiring Genomes: A Theory of the Origins of Species (Google eBook)

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Basic Books, Aug 1, 2008 - Science - 256 pages
10 Reviews
How do new species evolve? Although Darwin identified inherited variation as the creative force in evolution, he never formally speculated where it comes from. His successors thought that new species arise from the gradual accumulation of random mutations of DNA. But despite its acceptance in every major textbook, there is no documented instance of it. Lynn Margulis and Dorion Sagan take a radically new approach to this question. They show that speciation events are not, in fact, rare or hard to observe. Genomes are acquired by infection, by feeding, and by other ecological associations, and then inherited. Acquiring Genomes is the first work to integrate and analyze the overwhelming mass of evidence for the role of bacterial and other symbioses in the creation of plant and animal diversity. It provides the most powerful explanation of speciation yet given.
  

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Review: Acquiring Genomes: A Theory Of The Origin Of Species

User Review  - Miles - Goodreads

I have to preface this review with an important admission, which is that my background in popular science literature has definitely not prepared me to fully comprehend, let alone criticize, the finer ... Read full review

Review: Acquiring Genomes: A Theory Of The Origin Of Species

User Review  - Ann - Goodreads

This book blew my mind. Margulis has an innovative theory that symbiosis drives speciation, and her collaboration with her writer son makes the explanation lucid (although at least a college intro course in biology is recommended background). Read full review

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About the author (2008)

Lynn Margulis, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Geosciences at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, has been a member of the National Academy of Sciences since 1983. She is best known for her pathbreaking work on the bacterial origins of cell organelles and for her collaboration with James Lovelock on Gaia theory. Her previous books include Symbiosis in Cell Evolution; Five Kingdoms (with K. V. Schwartz); and (with Dorion Sagan) Origins of Sex, Garden of Microbial Delights, What Is Life?, What Is Sex?, and Slanted Truths: Essays on Gaia, Symbiosis and Evolution. Lynn Margulis, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a recipient of the 1999 Presidential Medal of Science, is Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Dorion Sagan is the author of Biospheres and the co-author of Up from Dragons: The Evolution of Human Intelligence. He lives in New York City.

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