The Song Cycle

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Cambridge University Press, 2010 - Music - 230 pages
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The song cycle was one of the most important musical genres of the nineteenth century. Famous examples by Schubert, Schumann and Mahler have received a great deal of attention. Yet many other cycles - by equally famous composers, from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries - have not. The Song Cycle introduces key concepts and a broad repertoire by tracing a history of the genre from Beethoven through to the present day. It explores how song cycles reflect the world around them and how national traditions and social relationships are represented in composers' choice of texts and musical styles. Tunbridge investigates how other types of music have influenced the scope of the song cycle, from operas and symphonies to popular song. A lively and engaging guide to this important topic, the book outlines how performance practices, from concert customs to new recording technologies, have changed the way we listen.
  

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Contents

Concepts
1
Sommermorgen One Bright Summer Morning Its an
12
Wanderers and balladeers
23
Organ Grinder There beyond the village An organgrinder
36
the long nineteenth century
40
Gendered voices
50
mir den ersten Schmerz getan Now you Have Caused me
52
the orchestral song cycle
64
Modern subjects
112
The death of the song cycle
123
the twentieth century
144
the late twentieth century
153
pop song cycles
169
Notes
187
Guide to further reading
213
Index
218

Travels abroad
81

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2010)

Laura Tunbridge is Senior Lecturer in Music at the University of Manchester. She is the author of Schumann's Late Style (2007) and co-editor of Rethinking Schumann, as well as having contributed chapters and articles to The Cambridge Companion to Schumann (2007), The Musical Quarterly, Music and Letters, the Cambridge Opera Journal, Opera Quarterly and The Journal of the Royal Musical Association.

Bibliographic information