The Founders: Portraits of Persons Born Abroad who Came to the Colonies in North America Before the Year 1701, with an Introduction, Biographical Outlines and Comments on the Portraits, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Boston athenaeum, 1919 - Portraits, American
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 193 - River, which was at a floud verie salt, at a low tide full of slime and filth, which was the destruction of many of our men. Thus we lived for the space of five moneths in this miserable distresse, not having five able men to man our Bulwarkes upon any occasion.
Page 98 - But all things, my lord, in this world pass away; statutum est; wife, children, honor, wealth, friends, and what else is dear to flesh and blood. They are but lent us till God please to call for them back again, that we may not esteem anything our own, or set our hearts upon anything but Him alone, who only remains forever.
Page 246 - It is true, in times past it was a crime to speak truth, and in that terrible court of star chamber many worthy and brave men suffered for so doing; and yet, even in that court, and in those bad times, a great and good man durst say what I hope will not be taken amiss of me to say in this place...
Page 249 - Rudeness that it was intollerable, and having then the command of the Militia, I sent an order to all the Captains, requiring them to call their Men under Arms, and to acquaint them, that in Case they would not in every Town agree amongst themselves to appoint Readers and pass the Sabbath in the best Manner they could, till such Times as they could be better provided, that they should every Sunday call their Companies under arms, and spend the Day in Exercise; whereupon it was unanimously agreed...
Page 194 - Savages hearts, we had all perished by those vild and cruell Pagans, being in that weake estate as we were ; our men night and day groaning in every corner of the Fort most pittifull to heare, if there were any conscience in men, it would make their harts to bleed to heare the...
Page 193 - Wee watched every three nights, lying on the bare cold ground, what weather soever came, [and] warded all the next day, which brought our men to bee most feeble wretches. Our food was but a small Can of Barlie...
Page 234 - So they brought the servant to the church, where the post stood, in order to whip him. The merchant then came to me, and requested me to speak to the minister, as it was my fault that he had given wine to his countryman. I accordingly went to the commander of our little fort or redoubt, and invited the minister and the mayor, and other leading men, with their wives, who were very fond of eating cherries ; as there were from forty to fifty cherry-trees standing about the redoubt, full of cherries....
Page 194 - If there were any conscience in men, it would make their harts to bleed to heare the pitifull murmurings and outcries of our sick men without reliefe, euery night and day for the space of sixe weekes : some departing out of the World, many times three or foure in a night ; in the morning their bodies being trailed out of their Cabines like Dogges, to be buried.
Page 208 - The people of America will not fail, when time has made things venerable, and when an intermixture of fable, has moulded useful truths into popular opinions, to mention with equal gratitude, and perhaps similar heightening circumstances, her Columbus, her Castro, her Gasca, her De Poincy, her Delaware, her Baltimore, and her Penn.
Page 193 - ... salt, at a low tide full of slime and filth, which was the destruction of many of our men. Thus we lived for the space of five months in this miserable distress, not having five able men to man our bulwarks upon any occasion. If it had not pleased God to put a terror in the savages...